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August 18, 2016

PAW Weekly Update

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SAMHSA
SAMHSA Prescription Drug Abuse Weekly Update
WEEKLY
UPDATE
Issue 187  |  August 18, 2016
The Prevention of Prescription Drug Abuse in the Workplace (PAW) TA Center addresses prescription drug abuse—a growing public health problem with increasing burdens on workers, workplaces, and our economy. To subscribe colleagues, family members, or friends to this listserv sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), please click here or send their e-mail addresses to paw@dsgonline.com.

WEBINAR

Employee-Targeted Webinar: A Workplace Wellness Approach for Prescription Misuse Prevention
SAMHSA
Sept. 7, 2016, 2–3:15 p.m. (ET)

This interactive webinar, facilitated by Joel Bennett, Ph.D., of Organizational Wellness & Learning Solutions, is geared toward workplace staff and best experienced in a group setting. Participants will learn about the role health consciousness plays in preventing prescription drug misuse; the risk factors associated with the increase in prescription drug misuse and healthy alternatives that can diminish those risks; action steps to implement healthy options; and how to reduce prescription drug misuse and addiction in their work setting. Those who plan on organizing a group to watch the webinar should contact Michael Neeper at MNeeper@OrganizationalWellness.com for materials to help with the session, including handouts and anonymous forms to assess changes in attitudes and behaviors resulting from the webinar. The webinar will also be archived on the SAMHSA YouTube site for later viewing.

Register:
https://join.onstreammedia.com/register/22396317/paw.
Index
Featured
Journal Articles and Reports
Professional Opinion
Professional Development
National
Marijuana
International
Northeast/Mid-Atlantic News
South News
Midwest News
West News
Video
Other Resources
Webinars
Grant Announcements
National Take-Back Initiative
Take-Back Events & Drop Boxes
Upcoming Conferences and Workshops

Featured

G. Sharma, Neal Oden, P.C. Van Veldhuisen, and M.P. Bogenschutz. 2016. “Hair Analysis and Its Concordance with Self-Report for Drug Users Presenting in Emergency Department.” Drug and Alcohol Dependence, doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.08.007.

This study compared self-reported drug use on the Timeline Follow Back instrument with drug use from hair analysis. Data came from 1285 adult emergency patients who reported moderate to severe problems related to drug use when recruited from six U.S. academic hospitals as part of the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network randomized trial. Hair analysis and interviews at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up visits each covered the past 90 days. Concordance between hair samples and interviews was high for cannabis and street opioids, but was low to moderate for cocaine and prescribed opioids. Under-reporting of drug use given the positive hair sample was always lower for the drug the study participant noted as their primary drug of choice compared with other drugs the participant reported taking. Over-reporting of drug use given a negative hair sample was always higher for the drug of choice, except for cocaine.

Read more:
http://www.drugandalcoholdependence.com/article/S0376-8716(16)30244-7/fulltext

J.F. Mosher. “The 2016 California Marijuana Initiative and Youth: Lessons from Alcohol Policy.” County of Ventura: Ventura County Behavioral Health, 2016.

The Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act would legalize nonmedical use of marijuana and has qualified for California’s November 2016 ballot as Proposition 64. This legal analysis of the act draws on alcohol policy experience and research findings. Proponents claim the act protects against potential risks to children and youth. In reality, it would adopt only 2 of 15 best practices for controlling underage access and partially adopt 4 others. Proponents also claim the act protects small- and medium-size businesses and deters monopolization of the market by a small number of large for-profit corporations, as has occurred in the alcohol and tobacco industries. In reality, it contains none of the 8 anti-monopolization regulatory strategies suggested by alcohol policy and the RAND study of marijuana legalization. It also rejects a role for nonprofit agencies in the marketplace.

Read more:
http://www.venturacountylimits.org/resources/article/C04F59/the-2016-california-marijuana-initiative-and-youth-lessons-from-alcohol-policy

Feds Announce Actions Related to Marijuana and Industrial Hemp
U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration
August 11, 2016

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) announced that marijuana will remain a Schedule I controlled substance because it does not meet the criteria for currently accepted medical use in treatment, accepted safety for its use under medical supervision is lacking, and it has a high potential for abuse. To accelerate research, DEA will expand the number of DEA-registered marijuana producers. Currently, the University of Mississippi is the only authorized producer. Federal agencies also released a statement of principles governing cultivation of industrial hemp for research purposes, as required by the Agricultural Act of 2014. The statement of principles addresses the extent to which private parties may grow industrial hemp as part of an agricultural pilot program and the circumstances under which sale of hemp products is permitted.

Read more:
https://www.dea.gov/divisions/hq/2016/hq081116.shtml

Related Article: Fed’s Marijuana Decision is More Important than Rescheduling
John Hudak, Brookings
August 11, 2016

The author suggests three reasons that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration ended the marijuana production monopoly: 1) researchers complained for decades about slow delivery, product that included plant components other than flower, a lack of diversity of strains and potency, an inability to custom order product with specific cannabinoids profiles, and difficulty accessing alternative products like extracts; 2) ending the monopoly will accelerate research to establish if marijuana has medical value, which may facilitate future rescheduling; and 3) public approval for medical marijuana use and related marijuana research is widespread, possibly demanding some action from a political viewpoint.

Read more:
https://www.brookings.edu/2016/08/11/the-deas-marijuana-decision-is-more-important-than-rescheduling

Journal Articles and Reports

A.M. Arens, X.M.R. van Wijk, K.T. Vo, K.L. Lynch, A.H.B. Wu, and C.G. Smollin. 2016. “Adverse Effects from Counterfeit Alprazolam Tablets.” JAMA Internal Medicine, doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.4306.

From October 15 to December 31, 2015, the California Poison Control System–San Francisco division identified eight patients who experienced adverse effects associated with the ingestion of street-sourced counterfeit alprazolam (Xanax) tablets found to contain fentanyl and, in some cases, etizolam. Identification of these patients resulted in a coordinated response that included state and local public health departments, a toxicology laboratory, and media outlets, and resulted in an investigation by local law enforcement agencies.

Read more:
http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2542417

C.A. Bautista, A.M. Iosif, B.L. Wilsey, J.A. Melnikow, A. Crichlow, and S.G. Henry. 2016. “Factors Associated with Opioid Dose Increases: A Chart Review of Patients’ First Year on Long-Term Opioids.” Pain Medicine, doi:10.1093/pm/pnw185.

In a Northern California academic medical system comprising multiple primary care and specialty clinics, of 246 patients who initiated opioids during July 2011 through June 2012 and stayed on them for at least a year, 22 had their dose raised by ≥30 mg morphine equivalents in the year after initiation and 224 did not. Each escalation case was matched to two controls (44 in total) drawn from the 224 patients who never escalated by that much. The 66 treatment and control patients had 674 health system encounters in the year after opioid initiation. Fifty-three percent of opioid prescriptions were issued after telephone encounters, 13 percent after e-mail encounters, and 34 percent after face-to-face visits. No prescribing rationale was documented for 43 percent of all opioid prescriptions and 25 percent of dose increases. Likelihood of dose increase and documentation of prescribing rationale did not significantly differ for cases versus controls. Cases were almost twice as likely as controls to be referred to a pain specialist (54.5 percent vs. 29.5 percent.) Compared with face-to-face encounters, dose increases were significantly less likely for telephone (odds ratio [OR] = 0.2) and e-mail (OR = 0.2) encounters. Documentation of prescribing rationale was significantly more likely for e-mail (OR = 5.1) and less likely for telephone (OR = 0.3) encounters.

Read more:
http://painmedicine.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/07/29/pm.pnw185.abstract

A. Cockrell Skinner, C. Ringwalt, R.B. Naumann, A.W. Roberts, L.A. Moss, N. Sachdeva, M.A. Weaver, and J. Farley. 2016. “Reducing Opioid Misuse: Evaluation of a Medicaid Controlled Substance Lock-In Program.” Journal of Pain, doi:10.1016/j.jpain.2016.07.003

From October 2008 through June 2013, North Carolina Medicaid moved 6,814 patients with opioid prescriptions into its Medicaid Lock-In Program (MLIP), which restricts the number of prescribers and dispensers. The odds of having any opioid claim in a given month was 84 percent lower during MLIP enrollment relative to the period prior to enrollment (odds ratio = 0.16). MLIP enrollment of a patient was associated with a reduction in monthly number of opioid prescriptions by 1.1, monthly number of pharmacies by 0.6, and monthly Medicaid expenditures by $23.

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1526590016301559

S. Glasner, L.J. Mooney, A. Ang, H.C. Garneau, E. Hartwell, M-L. Brecht, and R.A. Rawson. 2016. “Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention for Stimulant Dependent Adults: A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial.” Mindfulness, doi:10.1007/s12671-016-0586-9.

A pilot randomized clinical trial evaluated the effects of Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention, relative to a health education control condition among stimulant-dependent adults. All participants received a 12-week contingency management intervention. Following a 4-week lead in phase, 31 participants were randomly assigned to concurrently receive mindfulness and 32 to receive health education. Stimulant use was monitored with urine drug screens weekly during the intervention and at 1 month post-treatment. Mindfulness was associated with moderately reduced negative affect, depression severity, and overall psychiatric severity. Among those with depressive and anxiety disorders, it was associated with lower odds of stimulant use relative to the comparison condition (odds ratio = 0.7 to 0.8 during treatment and at 1-month follow-up).

Read more:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12671-016-0586-9

J.Y. Ko, S.W. Patrick, V.T. Tong, R. Patel, J.N. Lind, and W.D. Barfield. 2016. “Incidence of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome—28 States, 1999–2013.” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 65(31):799–802, August 12, 2016.

During 1999 through 2013, state-specific neonatal abstinence syndrome incidence rates increased significantly in 25 of 27 states with at least 3 years of data, with annual changes in incidence rates ranging from 0.05 per 1,000 hospital births (Hawaii) to 3.6 (Vermont). In 2013, incidence ranged from 0.7 per 1,000 hospital births (Hawaii) to 33.4 (West Virginia).

Read more:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6531a2.htm?s_cid=mm6531a2_w

K. Kruithof, J. Aldridge, D.D. Hétu, M. Sim, E. Dujso, and S. Hoorens. 2016. “Internet-Facilitated Drugs Trade: An Analysis of the Size, Scope and the Role of the Netherlands.” RAND Corporation, doi:10.7249/RR1607.

Roughly 50 online so-called “cryptomarkets” and vendor shops allow anonymous sellers and buyers to trade illegal drugs, new psychoactive substances, prescription drugs and other goods and services. This report analyzed trade on the so-called clear and hidden web, paying special attention to the Netherlands. Monthly revenues from visible sales of drugs on cryptomarkets were $20–25 million. Wholesale-level transactions exceeding $1,000 generated nearly one quarter of overall revenue both in September 2013 and in January 2016. Cannabis, stimulants and ecstasy were responsible for 70 percent of all cryptomarket revenues, with prescription drugs and alcohol accounting for 10–20 percent. Most vendors appeared to be operating from the United States (890), the United Kingdom (338), and Germany (225). Vendors indicating they ship from the United States generated 36 percent of all drug revenues. On a per capita basis, revenues to vendors operating from the Netherlands were 2.4 times higher than those from the United Kingdom and 4.5 times higher than those from the United States. The authors classify modes of detection and intervention as: traditional investigation techniques applied to drug chains, postal detection and interception, online detection, and online disruption.

Read more:
http://www.rand.org/pubs/research_reports/RR1607.html

C. Leong, S. Alessi-Severini, J. Sareen, M.W. Enns, and J. Bolton. 2016. “Community Pharmacists’ Perspectives on Dispensing Medications with the Potential for Misuse, Diversion, and Intentional Overdose: Results of a Province-Wide Survey of Community Pharmacists in Canada.” Substance Use & Misuse, doi:10.1080/10826084.2016.1197261.

A 2014 e-mail survey of community pharmacists listed in the College of Pharmacists of Manitoba directory drew a mere 82 responses. Most respondents considered a 1-month supply appropriate for a psychotropic agent, but a 7–10 day-supply was considered appropriate for an opioid for acute pain. Factors that aid pharmacist decisions on providing select medications to patients include familiarity with the patient, ease of access to medical history information, and ease of access to the prescribing physician. Only 10 percent, 16 percent, and 32 percent felt they had adequate training on the management of patients at risk for suicide, drug diversion, and medication misuse, respectively.

Read more:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10826084.2016.1197261

S. Mendoza, A.S. Rivera-Cabrero, and H. Hansen. 2016. “Shifting Blame: Buprenorphine Prescribers, Addiction Treatment, and Prescription Monitoring In Middle-Class America.” Transcultural Psychiatry, doi:10.1177/1363461516660884.

Interviews at nine municipal hospitals and three Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in New York City in 2013–14 drew responses from 53 physicians certified to manage opioid addiction with buprenorphine. The response rate was 60 percent. Respondents felt increased prescriber monitoring has shifted the focus from addicted people to prescribers as a threat, paradoxically driving users to illicit markets and constricting their access to pharmaceutical treatment for opioid addiction. Prescriber monitoring is also altering clinical cultures of care, as general physicians respond to heightened surveillance and the psychosocial complexities of treating addiction with either rejection of opioid dependent patients, or with resourceful attempts to create support systems for their treatment.

Read more:
http://tps.sagepub.com/content/early/2016/08/03/1363461516660884.abstract

J.F. Scherrer, J. Salas, M.D. Sullivan, F.D. Schneider, K.K. Bucholz, T. Burroughs, L. Copeland, B. Ahmedani, and P.J. Lustman. 2016. “The Influence of Prescription Opioid Use Duration and Dose on Development of Treatment Resistant Depression.” Preventive Medicine, doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.08.003.

Using 2000–12 Veterans Health Administration claims data on 500,000 randomly selected patients, this study identified 6,169 adults who were free of cancer and HIV, diagnosed with depression, and opioid-free for 24-months prior to initiating opioid use. In multivariate analysis controlling for pain and other sources of confounding, opioid use for 31–90 days and for greater than 90 days, compared to 1–30 days, was significantly associated with new onset treatment resistant depression (hazard ratios = 1.25 and 1.52, respectively). Morphine-equivalent dose (less than 50 mg per day vs. higher dosage) was not associated with new onset treatment resistant depression. The risk of developing treatment-resistant depression increased as time spent on opioid analgesics increased.

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0091743516302092

A. Singhal, Y.Y. Tien, and R.Y. Hsia. 2016. “Racial-Ethnic Disparities in Opioid Prescriptions at Emergency Department Visits for Conditions Commonly Associated with Prescription Drug Abuse.” PLoS One, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0159224.

Multivariate analysis of 2007–11 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data analyzed the odds of opioid administration or prescription during emergency department visits made by non-elderly adults ages 18–65 for ‘non-definitive’ conditions (toothache, back pain and abdominal pain) or ‘definitive’ conditions (long-bone fracture and kidney stones). Non-Hispanic black patients were less likely to receive opioid prescriptions at discharge during emergency department visits for back pain and abdominal pain (odds ratio = 0.56–0.67), but not for toothache, fractures and kidney stones, compared to non-Hispanic white patients. Differential prescription of opioids by race–ethnicity could lead to widening of existing disparities in health and may have implications for disproportionate burden of opioid misuse among white adults.

Read more:
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0159224

N. Soneji, H.A. Clarke, D.T. Ko, and D.N. Wijeysundera. 2016. “Risks of Developing Persistent Opioid Use After Major Surgery.” JAMA Surgery, doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2016.1681.

This study analyzed prescription data for 39,000 previously opioid-naive patients who underwent major elective surgery (coronary artery bypass, lung resection, colon resection, hysterectomy, or prostatectomy) between 2003 and 2010 and were alive a year after surgery. Fifty-three percent of the patients received one or more opioid prescriptions within 90 days after leaving the hospital. One year after surgery, only 168 (0.4 percent) were still prescribed an opioid. Lung surgery patients had the highest risk of long-term opioid use.

Read more:
http://archsurg.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2542665
https://consumer.healthday.com/mental-health-information-25/addiction-news-6/addiction-risk-low-for-seniors-when-opioids-given-after-surgery-study-713710.html

A.M. Vargovich, D.W. McNeil, K.P. Foley, and J. Sperry. 2016. “Impact of a Psychological Opioid-Risk Evaluation on Opioid Prescribing in Primary Care.” Family Medicine 48(7):538–45.

The 151 adult patients referred to the West Virginia University Department of Family Medicine for an opioid-risk evaluation between October 2010 and March 2013 completed a psychological interview and a variety of self-report instruments. The interviewer then scored their risk of opioid misuse as low, moderate, or high. Overall, 58 percent were prescribed opioids, including 86 percent of those at low risk, 60 percent of those at moderate risk, and 34 percent of those at high risk. In multivariate analysis, the risk score and substance abuse history predicted opioid prescribing, but demographics did not.

Read more:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27472791

T. Wilens, C. Zulauf, M. Martelon, N.R. Morrison, A. Simon, N.W. Carrellas, A. Yule, and R. Anselmo. 2016. “Nonmedical Stimulant Use in College Students: Association with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Other Disorders.” Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 77(7):940–7, doi:10.4088/JCP.14m09559

Paid structured interviews with a self-selected sample of 300 undergraduates ages 18–28 attending Boston-area colleges and universities included an oversample of 100 stimulant misusers. Misusers were more likely than other students to have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder or substance-use disorder. Immediate-release stimulants were more likely to be misused than extended-release versions. Misusers acquired or purchased stimulants from friends or acquaintances, were more likely than controls to indicate they used any drugs to “get high,” and reported a lower overall sense of wellbeing.

Read more:
http://www.psychiatrist.com/jcp/article/Pages/2016/v77n07/v77n0720.aspx
http://www.massgeneral.org/about/pressrelease.aspx?id=1972

Professional Opinion

R.P. Schwartz. 2016. “When Added to Opioid Agonist Treatment, Psychosocial Interventions Do Not Further Reduce the Use of Illicit Opioids: A Comment on Dugosh et al.” Journal of Addiction Medicine 10(4):283–5, doi:10.1097/ADM.0000000000000236

This commentary reviewed the limitations of a literature review by Dugosh et al. (2016) that examined the role of psychosocial interventions with medication for opioid addiction treatment. The commonly held belief that opioid agonist treatment alone is inferior treatment to combined with psychosocial counseling is not supported by the research evidence. This largely unsupported belief limits the use of these effective medications.

Read more:
http://journals.lww.com/journaladdictionmedicine/Abstract/2016/
08000/When_Added_to_Opioid_Agonist_Treatment,.12.aspx

Professional Development

C. Le Roux, Y. Tang, and K. Drexler. 2016. “Alcohol and Opioid Use Disorder in Older Adults: Neglected and Treatable Illnesses.” Current Psychiatry Reports, doi:10.1007/s11920-016-0718-x.

Read more:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11920-016-0718-x

K.A. Puntillo and R. Naidu. 2016. “Chronic Pain Disorders after Critical Illness and ICU-Acquired Opioid Dependence: Two Clinical Conundra.” Current Opinion in Critical Care, doi:10.1097/MCC.0000000000000343

Read More:
http://Journals.Lww.Com/Co-Criticalcare/Abstract/Publishahead/Chronic_Pain_Disorders_After_Critical_Illness_And.99328.Aspx

A. Robinson. 2016. “Causes and Management of Chronic Pain.” Prescriber. doi:10.1002/psb.1482

Read more:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/psb.1482/full

National

B.J. Rose. 2016. “High Doses of Loperamide Can Cause Serious Cardiac Events.” Pharmacy Today 22(7):34.

The FDA has warned that high doses or misuse of common over-the-counter and prescription antidiarrheal medicine loperamide can cause serious cardiac events.

Read more:
http://www.pharmacytoday.org/article/S1042-0991(16)30525-4/fulltext

FDA Advisory Panel Recommends Long-Acting Opioid That Could Deter Abuse
Partnership for Drug-Free Kids
August 10, 2016

An FDA advisory panel recommended approval of extended-release Arymo, a long-acting opioid pain reliever that its manufacturers claim is difficult to breakdown and misuse. If Arymo comes into contact with liquid, it turns into a sticky gel. However, someone can misuse the drug by snorting, chewing or injecting it.

Read more:
http://www.drugfree.org/news-service/fda-advisory-panel-recommends-long-acting-opioid-deter-abuse

Olympic Athletes Still Use Some Rx Drugs as a Path to ‘Legal Doping’
Jon Hamilton, NPR
August 10, 2016

Many Olympic athletes take advantage of a loophole that allows them to use “legal doping” or legal prescriptions not banned by anti-doping authorities to improve performance. Hundreds of athletes tested positive for the recently banned drug meldonium, but many complained that testing started before the drug had time to clear their system after the ban was announced. (Includes audio: 3:46 minutes)

Read more:
http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/08/10/488862344/olympic-athletes-still-use-some-rx-drugs-as-a-path-to-legal-doping

Marijuana

Z.D. Cooper and M. Haney. 2016. “Sex-Dependent Effects of Cannabis-Induced Analgesia.” Drug and Alcohol Dependence, doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.08.001.

This study compared the analgesic effects of active cannabis (3.56–5.60% tetrahydrocannabinol [THC]) and inactive cannabis (0.00% THC) in 21 male and 21 female adult cannabis smokers under double-blind conditions, with each user randomly exposed and tested on multiple occasions. On each occasion, users also randomly took a medication or placebo in conjunction with the marijuana. They were able to differentiate active cannabis, as judged by subjective ratings (“take again,” “liking,” “good drug effect”), drug strength, and “high” relative to inactive. Pain response was measured using the Cold-Pressor Test where participants immerse their hand in near-freezing water; times to report pain (pain sensitivity) and withdraw the hand (pain tolerance) are recorded. Active cannabis significantly decreased pain sensitivity relative to inactive cannabis in men but not in women. It increased pain tolerance in both men and women immediately after smoking.

Read more:
http://www.drugandalcoholdependence.com/article/S0376-8716(16)30223-X/fulltext

J. McCarthy. “One in Eight U.S. Adults Say They Smoke Marijuana.” Gallup. August 8, 2016.

Gallup conducted telephone interviews on July 13–17, 2016, with a random sample of 1,023 U.S. adults. Thirteen percent said they are current marijuana users, up from 11 percent in 2015 and 7 percent in 2013. Lifetime, 43 percent of U.S. adults say they have tried marijuana, similar to the 44 percent in 2015 and up slightly from 38 percent in 2013 and 33 percent in 1985. Use and experimentation are higher among younger adults and low among church-goers.

Read more:
http://www.gallup.com/poll/194195/adults-say-smoke-marijuana.aspx?g_source=marijuana&g_medium=search&g_campaign=tiles

Missouri Medical Marijuana Initiative Falls Short on Signatures for November Ballots
Sarah Fenske, Riverfront Times
August 9, 2016

Though it raised $1.3 million in contributions, New Approach Missouri did not get enough signatures to put the medical marijuana initiative on the November ballot. The group gathered 40,745 signatures, but only 32,337 were valid. This made it 2,200 signatures short. New Approach Missouri plans to file a lawsuit to challenge the secretary of state’s ruling. The group believes that it will get the measure on the ballot.

Read more:
http://www.riverfronttimes.com/newsblog/2016/08/09/missouri-medical-marijuana-initiative-falls-short-on-signatures-for-november-ballots

Mass Marijuana Overdose in California Latest in Worrisome Trend of Children Poisoned
Lindzi Wessel, STAT
August 9, 2016

Nineteen people in California, mostly teens and children, were taken to the hospital for consuming gummy candy likely tainted with tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana. The mass marijuana overdose caused dizziness, confusion, and dilated pupils in people who ate the gummies at a teen’s birthday party. Authorities still do not know where the candy came from and they are waiting for lab results to confirm they contained THC. Some sick partygoers tested positive for the chemical.

Read more:
https://www.statnews.com/2016/08/09/edible-marijuana-kids

Man Faces Drug Charge after 24 Stricken At Ohio Music Festival
Associated Press
August 8, 2016

Matthew Gross has been charged with felony drug trafficking after 24 people were sickened at an Ohio music festival when they ate candy laced with the marijuana ingredient tetrahydrocannabinol. Those sickened are expected to recover.

Read more:
http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_OHIO_CONCERT_OVERDOSES?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2016-08-07-01-36-08

Marin (Calif.) Health Board Member Proposes Open Use of Medical Marijuana at Marin General
Richard Halstead, Marin Independent Journal
August 8, 2016

Larry Bedard, M.D., a longtime member of the Marin (Calif.) Healthcare District board, wants to allow patients to openly use medicinal cannabis at Marin General Hospital. Bedard, a retired emergency medicine physician, has already sent his resolution proposing inpatient use of medicinal cannabis at Marin General to the hospital’s managers, his fellow board members, and other interested parties. In his resolution, Bedard acknowledges that Marin General administrators are “concerned that the federal government could/would retaliate by lifting the hospital’s Medicare provider number and the state could withhold Medi-Cal funding.” However, a federal budget amendment prevents the government from using federal funds to penalize patients, physicians and hospitals that are complying with state law.

Read more:
http://www.marinij.com/article/NO/20160808/NEWS/160809854

Three Ways On-The-Job Marijuana Use Could Impact Your Business Insurance
Galen Hayes, Property Casualty 360
August 5, 2016

This article speculates about three ways on-the-job use of marijuana conceivably could affect insurance premiums and cost of doing business. First, any failure to perform as required by contractual obligations may result in the bonding company non-renewing a performance bond. Finding replacement bonds could not be difficult and expensive. Large or frequent claims also may result in non-renewals or declinations of coverage by liability insurance companies. Second, frequent workers compensation claims related to marijuana or other drug use can cause a policy to be non-renewed. This may lead to an employer seeking coverage from the state insurance fund which can be 200 to 300 percent higher than the private market. Third, most workers compensation insurers offer a drug-free workplace premium credit. Without these programs, an employer will likely pay higher premiums. The author recommends that employers ask a human resources professional or employment lawyer to review the current employee manual to address marijuana usage in the workplace.

Read more:
http://www.propertycasualty360.com/2016/08/05/3-ways-on-the-job-marijuana-use-could-impact-your

International

Hundreds of Drivers Fail Drink and Drugs Tests in Wales
BBC News
August 11, 2016

Officers from Wales’s four police forces conducted more than 9,500 breath tests and 190 drug wipes during the All Wales Campaign in June and July. A total of 306 motorists failed drink-drive breath tests and 131 others tested positive for drugs. In 2015, 52 drivers tested positive for drugs after new laws were introduced. Drivers face prosecution if they exceed limits set for the presence of eight illegal drugs and eight prescription drugs which includes morphine, diazepam, lorazepam, and methadone.

Read more:
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-37037117

150 Public Officials in The Philippines Linked To Drugs
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
August 8, 2016

The Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte publicly linked more than 150 judges, mayors, lawmakers, police and military personnel to illegal drugs, ordering them to surrender for investigation. President Duterte relieved members of the military and police from their current posts and ordered government security personnel to be withdrawn from politicians as identified in a nationally televised speech. He also ordered gun licenses of those named revoked.

Read more:
http://www.post-gazette.com/news/world/2016/08/08/World-Briefs-150-public-officials-linked-to-drugs/stories/201608080046

Northeast/Mid-Atlantic News

Beaver County (Pa.) Drug Overdose Deaths Nearly Double Since 2012
Kate Malongowski, The Times
August 11, 2016

In Beaver County, Pa., 35 confirmed overdose deaths and 11 pending final determination have already occurred in 2016, up from 37 overdose deaths in Beaver County in all of 2015 and 20 in 2012. More than half of the 125 people who died from overdoses in Beaver County between 2012 and 2015 had heroin in their system; 22 percent had fentanyl present; and 21 percent had cocaine present.

Read more:
http://www.timesonline.com/news/local_news/beaver-county-drug-overdose-deaths-nearly-double-since-according-to/article_b7b20f7a-5f38-11e6-9746-0bd25d0be286.html

Middlesex (Mass.) District Attorney Warns Seniors Addict May Target Medication
Meredith Gorman, Boston Herald
August 10, 2016

The Middlesex (Mass.) district attorney has warned senior citizens at Medford Senior Center in Massachusetts to watch their prescription drugs. He also discussed how to recognize whether someone around them is opioid-addicted and might be targeting their medicine cabinet. Ryan suggested counting the number of pills in prescription bottles, monitoring houseguests, and checking for missing items that are commonly snatched up by opioid addicts such as items in foil packages, spoons, jewelry, credit cards, and pills. (Includes video: 0:59 minutes)

Read more:
http://www.bostonherald.com/news/local_coverage/2016/08/
da_warns_seniors_addicts_may_target_medication


New York Pharmacist Faces Up To 25 Years after Conviction in Drug Scheme
John Valenti, Times-Enterprise
August 10, 2016

Pharmacist Ira Gross may receive up to 25 years in prison after being convicted of billing $274 million in illegal medication to Medicaid and other health care agencies. He pocketed $25 million from the illegal sale of black-market medications, all the while exposing HIV patients to expired and mislabeled drugs. Gross was convicted and found guilty of first-degree grand larceny, first-degree attempted grand larceny, first-degree criminal diversion of prescription medications and prescriptions, first-degree attempted criminal diversion of prescription medications and prescriptions, three counts of first-degree money laundering, second-degree money laundering, first-degree commercial bribing and fourth-degree conspiracy.

Read more:
http://www.timesenterprise.com/news/new-york-pharmacist-faces-up-to-years-after-conviction-in/article_e0de8f14-5e92-11e6-ae38-9fb2023b4cfd.html

South News

Alabama Doctors Partner with Physician Group to Fight Opioid Epidemic
Rashad Snell, Alabama News Network
August 10, 2016

The Medical Association of the State of Alabama and the American Medical Association (AMA) are partnering to develop and distribute a statewide educational toolbox that incorporates the best information from both agencies. The toolbox, available online and in print, will be provided to physicians and other healthcare professionals with key data, valuable resources, and practice-specific recommendations they need to enhance their decision-making when caring for patients with chronic or acute pain and opioid use disorders, and for patients needing overdose prevention education. The toolbox will be released in September. Alabama and Rhode Island are the first two states partnering in this pilot program with the AMA.

Read more:
http://www.alabamanews.net/2016/08/10/alabama-doctors-partner-with-ama-to-fight-opioid-epidemic

West Virginia Leaders Suggest FDA Review Prescription Drug Supply to Curb Opioid Addiction
Carrie Hodousek, West Virginia MetroNews Network
August 9, 2016

During a roundtable discussion, West Virginia’s governor and U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) told the FDA commissioner to look at the oversupply of prescription drugs to reduce West Virginia’s opioid misuse problem. The governor believes opioids are being prescribed to people who do not need them. FDA leaders plan to meet next month to discuss expanding naloxone access through over the counter purchases.

Read more:
http://wvmetronews.com/2016/08/09/w-va-leaders-suggest-fda-reviews-prescription-drug-supply-to-curb-opioid-addiction

Mississippi Opioid Epidemic Mirror’s Nation’s Struggle
Desare Frazier, Mississippi Public Broadcasting
August 9, 2016

The Mississippi opioid epidemic mirrors the nation’s problems with prescription pain pills and heroin abuse. The state’s Bureau of Alcohol and Drug Services reported a 5.1 percent increase in usage of opioids last year. This number may triple in next year’s data. The Mississippi Pharmacy Board reported that doctors wrote nearly eight million prescriptions for narcotics last year. Mississippi Board of Narcotics reported that 108 Mississippians died from opioid misuse last year. The Mississippi State Medical Association is reeducating doctors about opioids and alternatives to managing pain. (Includes audio: 5:31 minutes)

Read more:
http://www.mpbonline.org/blogs/news/2016/08/09/ms-opioid-epidemic-mirrors-nations-struggle-with-prescription-pill-and-heroin-abuse

Treating Prescription Drug Abuse in Mississippi Through Drug Court, Not Just Jail Time
Desare Frazier, Mississippi Public Broadcasting
August 11, 2016

Mississippi offers drug court to individuals who face charges for crimes related to opioid drug addiction. They receive treatment instead of going to jail. This voluntary program targets those who have a severe drug problem and commit a felony crime, but are non-violent. Drug dealers cannot participate. Two-thirds of the clients in the Warren County Drug Court complete the program. Currently, 84 people participate in the program. Addicts go into inpatient treatment for 30–90 days. Once they complete treatment they return to the court system and start seeing the judge regularly. They take a drug test at least three times a week; and attend recovery meetings 5 days per week. Clients who relapse have to pay for treatment. The judge and court coordinator meet weekly with law enforcement, the district attorney’s office, treatment facilities and a doctor who provides free examinations to discuss how each client is progressing, address violations, and review requests for potential participants. The goal is return individuals to their communities so they can be viable citizens, taxpayers, and earn a living.

Read more:
http://www.mpbonline.org/blogs/news/2016/08/11/treating-prescription-drug-abuse-through-drug-court-not-just-jail-time

Drug More Potent Than Heroin Linked to 13 Deaths in Lafayette (La.)
KLFY
August 5, 2016

Lafayette Parish, La., officials are warning residents about the dangers of fentanyl. Thirteen fatal overdoses have been link to the drug this year. Only three people died from fentanyl overdose in Lafayette last year. (Includes video: 2:02 minutes)

Read more:
http://klfy.com/2016/08/05/authorities-warn-of-fentanyl-abuse-after-13-overdose-deaths-in-lafayette-parish

DrugFree America Tells Naples (Fla.) Businesses How to Fight Drugs in the Workplace
June Fletcher, Naples Daily News
August 11, 2016

DrugFree America Foundation spoke to Naples (Fla.) businesses about drugs in the workplace. Speakers gave an overview of the problem and the drugs most commonly used and misused. They warned the 100 attendees aware that illegal drugs can show up in the workplace as gummy bears, cookies, capsules, drops, and lip balm. The speakers also discussed the side effects and costs of employees using drugs. They recommend that employers establish clear policies on drug use, including the consequences, and applying them consistently. The Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce sponsored this event.

Read more:
http://www.naplesnews.com/story/money/business/local/2016/08/10/drugfree-america-tells-naples-businesses-how-fight-drugs-workplace/88510104

Florida Investigators Find Prescription Drugs Disguised as Sex Enhancement Pills at Local Stores
Cory Pippin, CBS 12
August 11, 2016

A Florida convenience storeowner was arrested for selling prescription drugs disguised as over-the-counter male sex enhancement pills. Jagdishchandra Patel sold “Jack Rabbit” to an undercover agent for over a month; and he told the agent that he had more illegal substances. The male enhancement sex supplements were Viagra which was unlawfully sold without a prescription. Investigators are concerned that underage people may have purchased substances from the store. The investigation began in April.

Read more:
http://cbs12.com/news/local/state-investigators-find-prescription-drugs-disguised-as-sex-enhancement-pills-at-local-st

Heroin Overdose Deaths Rise in Oklahoma as Access to Treatment Lags
Jaclyn Cosgrove, The Oklahoman
August 7, 2016

As officials responded to the prescription drug misuse epidemic, Oklahoma saw a decrease in drug-overdose deaths, from 870 in 2014 to 823 to 2015. More Oklahomans are misusing and overdosing heroin as the state cracks down on prescription drug misuse. The state lacks long-term treatment for residents who struggle with addiction.

Read more:
http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/health/heroin-overdose-deaths-rise-in-oklahoma-as-access-to-treatment/article_c0bebc29-22c1-57ac-bac5-18bbf6c73753.html

Midwest News



Indiana Attorney General, Colts Team Up to Combat Teen Prescription Drug Abuse
Indiana 105
August 5, 2016

Indiana’s attorney general is teaming up with the Indianapolis Colts football team to address teen prescription drug misuse. Hoosier middle and high school students are invited to enter the #kickRxabuse video challenge by creating and uploading a 30-second YouTube video that highlights the dangers of misusing prescription medications. The winning video will be featured on the attorney general’s website, the official Colts website, social media, and Colts programming.

Read more:
http://indiana105.com/region-news/ag-zoeller-colts-teaming-up-to-combat-teen-prescription-drug-abuse

Opioid Abusers Range from Day Laborers to Doctors in Nebraska
Riley Johnson, and Nichole Manna, Lincoln Journal Star
August 8, 2016

Nebraska officials have seen people from all walks of life break the law because of their addictions. They falsify their prescriptions, sell them on the street, rob pharmacists, and drive while high. In the past 3 years, 11 Nebraska physicians or pharmacists surrendered federal certification allowing them to distribute controlled substances. An Omaha doctor is on probation until 2019 after he was fired from a hospital in 2014 for taking tramadol from patients for his own use. He asked patients to bring their medication to appointments, then either skimmed doses or took entire containers, saying it was being discontinued. In another case, a registered nurse was fired in Lincoln for stealing dozens of tramadol tablets on three occasions last summer.

Read more:
http://journalstar.com/news/local/911/opioid-abusers-range-from-day-laborers-to-doctors/article_dc580bb1-5c8c-569c-9801-5eb24c59b61b.html

Criminal Activity Tied to Prescription Drugs Increasing in Missouri
Alyssa Toomey, KQFX
August 9, 2016

Law enforcement officials in Missouri have seen an increase in criminal activity related to misuse and illegal transfers of prescription medication. Recently, an armed robber stole prescriptions from a pharmacy in Columbia. (Includes video: 2:32 minutes)

Read more:
http://www.abc17news.com/news/law-enforcement-criminal-activity-tied-to-prescription-drugs-increasing/41125902

Alleged ‘Pill-Popping’ Dispatcher in Ohio Court
Melissa Topey, Sandusky Register
August 12, 2016

Adam Herrara, a former Sandusky County dispatch supervisor, made his first appearance in an Ohio courtroom since being indicted on June 30. He was charged with one count of breaking and entering and one count of theft of a dangerous drug in which he pled not guilty. Herrara allegedly got into a co-worker’s car to look for prescription pills. Herrara also had been showing up at work under the influence and acting erratically and falling asleep. He also was leaving his post un-manned. Sheriff’s Detective Sean O’Connell confirmed Herrera was misusing prescription medications, but no disciplinary action initially was taken against him and he was not referred for counseling. Herrera is currently employed in the private sector.

Read more:
http://www.sanduskyregister.com/Law-Enforcement/2016/08/11/Alleged-pill-popping-former-dispatcher-in-court

Walgreens Launches Safe Medication Disposal Kiosk Program in Illinois
Business Wire
August 8, 2016

Walgreens has installed drug take-back kiosks at 45 drugstores in Illinois.

Read more:
http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20160808005292/en/Walgreens-Launches-Safe-Medication-Disposal-Kiosk-Program

West News

New Washington Driver License Test to Include Marijuana, Distracted Driving Questions
CNN Wire
August 11, 2016

Washington State’s licensing department will be adding questions on its test that focus on prescription drug use and marijuana. One question added is how much THC can appear in the system of a driver who is under 21. (The correct answer is none.)

Read more:
http://q13fox.com/2016/08/11/new-washington-driver-license-test-to-include-marijuana-distracted-driving-questions

Arizona Governor Signs Legislation to Combat Opioid Misuse
KNXV
August 5, 2016

Arizona's governor has signed into law legislation that gives physicians better access to an updated controlled substance prescription monitoring program and allows pharmacists to give naloxone to people without a prescription. (Includes video: 1:55 minutes)

Read more:
http://www.abc15.com/news/state/arizona-governor-doug-ducey-signs-bill-to-take-effect-saturday-programs-to-help-the-state

California Community College Police Working to Prevent Drug Overdoses
Chris Nguyen, KGO-TV
August 8, 2016

Foothill-De Anza Community College campus police became the first law enforcement agency in Santa Clara County, Calif., to equip all of its sworn officers with naloxone. (Includes video: 2:51)

Read more:
http://abc7news.com/society/foothill-de-anza-campus-police-to-prevent-drug-overdoses/1462163

Video

Concerns Grow As Fentanyl Fuels Rise in Opioid Overdose Deaths
PBS Newshour
August 6, 2016

David Armstrong of STAT, a national publication produced by Boston Globe Media, joins Hari Sreenivasan to talk about the threat posed by fentanyl and how significant the drug is in relation to opioid overdoses. (Duration: 5:51 minutes)

Watch:
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/concerns-grow-fentanyl-fuels-rise-opioid-overdose-deaths

Other Resources

Why You Should Skip Adderall as a Study Drug
Steve Mitchell, Consumer Reports
August 12, 2016

This article discusses the side effects of nonmedical use of Adderall. The American Medical Association (AMA) recently announced that this type of drug is risky, does not help improve grades, and should be avoided. The AMA’s new policy also urged physicians not to prescribe stimulants and other so-called “smart drugs” to healthy people seeking to enhance studying. This article includes a list of better, safer study strategies.

Read more:
http://www.consumerreports.org/drugs/skip-adderall-as-study-drug

Webinars

Conversations: Putting Research into Action
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America
Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016 | 2:30–3:30 p.m. (ET)

Ty Brumback, Ph.D., from the University of California, San Diego, will present his findings regarding the effects of marijuana use on brain structure and function. His work includes neuroimaging findings from a neurodevelopmental perspective. The Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America evaluation and research team will ask questions about the article’s implications for coalition work.

Register:
http://research.zarca.com/survey.aspx?k=SsXVVSsSXsPsPsP&lang=0&data=

Reducing Opioid Abuse by Incorporating Patient Management Strategies from Psychiatry and Behavioral Health
American Dental Association
Aug. 24, 2016 | 3–4 p.m. (ET)
http://pcss-o.org/event/reducing-opioid-abuse-by-incorporating-patient-management-strategies-from-psychiatry-and-behavioral-health

Pain Management in Dentistry: A Changing and Challenging Landscape
American Dental Association
Sept. 2, 2016 | 3–4 p.m. (ET)
http://pcss-o.org/event/pain-management-in-dentistry-a-changing-and-challenging-landscape

Grant Announcements

Safety and Outcome Measures of Pain Medications Used in Children and Pregnant Women (R03) | (R01) | (R21)
National Institutes of Health
Due: Oct. 16, 2016 | Jan. 7, 2020 | Jan. 7, 2020
Read more (R03):
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-16-313.html
Read more (R01):
http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=284425
Read more (R21):
http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=284428

Safety and Outcome Measures of Pain Medications Used in Children and Pregnant Women (R03) | (R01) | (R21)
National Institutes of Health
Due: Oct. 16, 2016 | Jan. 7, 2020 | Jan. 7, 2020
Read more (R03):
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-16-313.html
Read more (R01):
http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=284425
Read more (R21):
http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=284428

Bottle Tracking Program
National Association of Drug Diversion Investigators
Due: None Specified
http://www.naddi.org/aws/NADDI/pt/sp/programs_grants
http://naddibottletracking.org/law-enforcement

National Take-Back Initiative

National Take-Back Initiative
Drug Enforcement Administration
Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016
10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drug_disposal/takeback

Take-Back Events & Drop Boxes

Prescription Drug Take Back Scheduled in Brantley (Ala.) August 25
Greenville Advocate
Aug. 12, 2016
http://www.greenvilleadvocate.com/2016/08/12/prescription-drug-take-back-day-scheduled-in-brantley

Wisconsin in Top Three for Unused Drug Collection
Anne Jungen, La Crosse Tribune
August 11, 2016
http://lacrossetribune.com/news/local/pounds-wisconsin-in-top-three-for-unused-drug-collection/article_685962dd-2d34-5143-b8bf-65176343a979.html

Doctors Launch Drug Take-Back Program at Georgia State
Newton Citizen
August 11, 2016
http://www.newtoncitizen.com/news/local/doctors-launch-drug-take-back-program-at-georgia-state/article_7863ff6b-eb19-5105-bce1-b64c36e0c2de.html

Nampa (Idaho) Police Department Installs Prescription Drug Drop Box
Steve Bertel, KIVI-TV
August 10, 2016
http://www.kivitv.com/news/nampa-police-department-installs-prescription-drug-drop-box

New Kiosks Added in the Fight Against Opioid Addiction in Iowa
Laura Terrell, KCCI
August 10, 2016
http://www.kcci.com/news/walgreens-adding-medication-disposal-kiosks-in-iowa-stores/41134048

Canton (Mich.) Embraces 24/7 Drop-Off Effort
Darrell Clem, Canton Observer
August 12, 2016
http://www.hometownlife.com/story/news/local/canton/2016/08/12/canton-drug-takeback-program-success/88614594

Fort Lee (N.J.) Provides Medicine Drop-Off Box
Svetlana Shkolnikova, NorthJersey.com
August 5, 2016
http://www.northjersey.com/community-news/borough-provides-medicine-drop-off-1.1640331

‘Shed the Meds’ Program in Peekskill (N.Y.)
Lanning Taliaferro, Peekskill Patch
August 10, 2016
http://patch.com/new-york/peekskill/shed-meds-program-peekskill

Ohio Attorney General Touts Pharmacy’s Drug Drop-Off Program
Marc Kovac, Nordonia Hills News-Leader
August 5, 2016
http://www.the-news-leader.com/regional/2016/08/05/ohio-attorney-general-touts-pharmacys-drug-dropoff-program

Upcoming Events, Conferences, and Workshops

National Symposium on Law Enforcement and Public Health Partnerships: “Saving Lives: Innovative Solutions to the Opioid Crisis”
U.S. Attorney’s Office, District of Minnesota, the U.S. Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, and the Hazelden Betty Ford Institute for Recovery Advocacy
Sept. 7–8, 2016
Minneapolis Convention Center
Ballroom A & B
1301 2nd Ave S
Minneapolis, Minn.

Law enforcement and public health experts will discuss how to establish critical partnerships and effective programs for combatting heroin, fentanyl, and prescription opioid problems.

Read more:
http://www.hazelden.org/web/public/event.view?eventId=5504149


Prescription Drug Abuse Forums
One Care
Sept. 10, 2016 | Lynchburg, Va.
Sept. 11, 2016 | Midlothian, Va.
Sept. 24, 2016 | Abingdon, Va.
Sept. 25, 2016 | Blacksburg, Va.

Conference objectives include incorporating overdose prevention education and naloxone rescue kits into medical and pharmacy practice by educating patients about overdose risk reduction and furnishing naloxone rescue kits; evaluating current scientific approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of substance use disorders; describing licensing boards’ required approaches to pain management; comparing options available for treatment of opioid dependence with a focus on safety, efficacy and appropriate prescribing precautions; describing the universal precautions for prescribing controlled substances; and interpreting prescription drug monitoring reports as a routine practice in patient-centered care.

Read more:
http://www.msv.org/MainMenuCategories/MemberCenter/PressRoom/News/2016-Archives/Upcoming-prescription-drug-abuse-forums--.aspx

2016 Annual Conference
International Health Facility Diversion Association
Sept. 13–14, 2016
Cincinnati, Ohio
https://ihfda.org/2016-annual-conference

Register:
https://www.regonline.com/Register/Checkin.aspx?EventID=1803476

Twenty-Ninth Annual National Prevention Network Conference
National Prevention Network
Sept. 13–15, 2016
Buffalo, N.Y.
http://www.npnconference.org

Register:
http://www.npnconference.org/registration

2016 Conference: Saving Lives: Access to Improved Health & Recovery
American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence
Oct. 29 – Nov. 2, 2016
Baltimore, Md.
http://www.aatod.org/national-conference/2016-aatod-conference-baltimore

Register:
http://www.aatod.org/national-conference/2016-aatod-conference-baltimore/register-now

2016 Fall Research Conference: The Role of Research in Making Government More Effective
Association for Public Policy Analysis & Management
Nov. 3–5, 2016
Washington, D.C.
http://www.appam.org/events/fall-research-conference/2016fall-research-conference-information

Bridging the Gaps: Reducing Prescription Drug and Opioid Abuse and Misuse Summit
National Association of Attorneys General and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials
Nov. 14–16, 2016
Arlington, Va.
http://www.naag.org/nagtri/nagtri-courses/national/bridging-the-gaps-reducing-prescription-drug-and-opioid-abuse-and-misuse-summit.php

National Rx Drug Abuse & Heroin Summit
Operation Unite
April 17–20, 2017
Atlanta, Ga.
https://vendome.swoogo.com/2017-rx-summit/8082

Call for Presentations
Submission Deadline Date: Friday, Aug. 5, 2016
https://vendome.swoogo.com/2017-rx-summit/2017-CFP
The Weekly Update is a service provided by the SAMHSA Preventing Prescription Abuse in the Workplace Technical Assistance Center (PAW) to keep the field abreast of recent news and journal articles to assist in forming policy, research, and programs to reduce prescription drug misuse or abuse. Please note, the materials listed are not reflective of SAMHSA's or PAW's viewpoint or opinion and are not assessed for validity, reliability or quality. The Weekly Update should not be considered an endorsement of the findings. Readers are cautioned not to act on the results of single studies, but rather to seek bodies of evidence. Copyright considerations prevent PAW from providing full text of journal articles listed in the Weekly Update.