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December 26, 2012

SAMHSA Prevention of Prescription Drug Abuse in the Workplace Listserv

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December 26, 2012  (PDF version)

 
Feature Article of Importance 
 
Preventing Misuse and Abuse of Prescription Stimulants Among Students
Children's Safety Network
December 17, 2012

This presentation showcased two university-based efforts designed to prevent misuse and abuse of prescription stimulants (e.g., Adderall and Ritalin): The Ohio State University's social norms campaign and the University of Texas at Austin's evidence-based, health communications campaign. It reviewed available resources for prescription drug abuse, explored students' perspectives on this issue, described a student government response, outlined the development of a health communication campaign, and drew from the growing body of literature about the misuse of prescription stimulants. The Webinar archive, PowerPoint slides, and resources shared during the session are available to download.
 
Read more:
http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org/webinar/preventing-abuse-prescription-stimulants-among-students 
 
 
Journal Articles
 
O. Hayden Griffin and Joseph F. Spillane. 2012. "Pharmaceutical Regulation Failures and Changes: Lessons Learned From OxyContin Abuse and Diversion." Journal of Drug Issues. doi:10.1177/0022042612467990.

OxyContin was given Food and Drug Administration approval in December 1995. By 1999, extensive reports of OxyContin abuse and diversion began to circulate. As seven investigational hearings conducted by the U.S. Congress exposed, several changes were made to the abuse liability assessment to correct deficiencies in the system that had aggravated OxyContin abuse and diversion.

Read more:
http://jod.sagepub.com/content/early/2012/12/07/0022042612467990.abstract

 
Tea Lallukka, Jari Haukka, Timo Partonen, Ossi Rahkonen, and Eero Lahelma. 2012. "Workplace Bullying and Subsequent Psychotropic Medication: A Cohort Study With Register Linkages." BMJ Open 2(6). doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2012-001660.

Researchers studied whether workplace bullying was associated with subsequent psychotropic medication among women and men. They asked questions about current and previous bullying as well as observing bullying behavior and highlighted the significance of workplace bullying to subsequent psychotropic medication reflecting medically confirmed mental problems.

Read more:
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/2/6/e001660.abstract?sid=7affcf8a-5e15-4dd4-83b8-8ca44692e6bc
 
 
Related Article
More Meds for Victims of Workplace Bullying
Psych Central
December 13, 2012

Researchers asked 6,606 public service employees about their experiences with workplace bullying, both personal and witnessed, between 2000 and 2002. They found workplace bullying was associated with subsequent prescriptions for psychoactive drugs in both men and women. Women were 50 percent likelier to have a prescription for these drugs, while men were twice as likely if they had been bullied at work. Women were 53 percent likelier to be prescribed a psychoactive drug, while men were twice as likely to receive a prescription if they had witnessed workplace bullying.

Read more:
http://psychcentral.com/news/2012/12/13/more-meds-for-victims-of-workplace-bullying/49060.html
 
 
Janice Phillips. 2012. "Prescription Drug Abuse: Problem, Policies, and Implications." Nursing Outlook. doi:10.1016/j.outlook.2012.06.009.

This article provides an overview of prescription drug abuse and highlights a number of related legislative bills introduced during the 112th Congress. It underscores the importance of a multifaceted approach to combating prescription drug abuse and concludes with implications for nursing.

Read more:
http://www.nursingoutlook.org/article/S0029-6554(12)00145-5/abstract

 
Sung-Shun Weng, Yi-Hua Chen, Ching-Chun Lin, Joseph J. Keller, I-Te Wang, and Herng-Ching Lin. 2012. "Physician Characteristics and Prescription Drug Use During Pregnancy: A Population-Based Study." Annals of Epidemiology. doi:10.1016/j.annepidem.2012.11.007.

Researchers explored the relationship between physician characteristics and their prescribing behavior regarding category D and X drugs for pregnant women by using a population-based data set in Taiwan. The sampled population for the study included 14,430 women. Of the total 198,420 prescriptions they received, 4.2 percent were prescribed category D and X drugs. They concluded that physician characteristics, including sex, age, specialty, and practice location, were associated with the prescription of category D and X drugs for pregnant women.

Read more:
http://www.annalsofepidemiology.org/article/S1047-2797(12)00427-9/abstract

 
R. Wade-Mdivanian, D. Anderson-Butcher, K. Hale, N. Kwiek, J. Smock, D. Radigan, and J. Lineberger. 2012. "Utilizing Business, University, and Community Resources to Target Adolescent Prescription Drug Abuse." Prevention Researcher 19(1):17-20.

This article highlights Generation Rx, a prescription drug abuse prevention strategy that includes a "toolkit" designed to be used with youths. It showcases how two community-based programs have implemented components of the toolkit, and presents a preliminary assessment of its impact.

Read more:
http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=EJ976379&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=EJ976379

 
News and Reports

Hundreds of High-Prescribers Don't Check Oregon's Pharmacy-Monitoring Program
The Oregonian
December 18, 2012

This article explains that 2,000 providers are responsible for more than 60 percent of prescriptions. About 1,100 of this group have registered to use the state database. An October 2012 report by the state's Prescription Drug Monitoring Program found that between Oct. 1, 2011, and March 31, 2012, more than 600,000 people filled a prescription for an opioid drug; almost 70 people filled prescriptions written by 10 to 14 providers at 10 to 14 pharmacies. Twenty people filled prescriptions written by 15 or more providers at 15 or more pharmacies.

Read more:
http://www.oregonlive.com/health/index.ssf/2012/12/hundreds_of_high-prescribers_d.html

 
Drug Overdose Morbidity and Mortality in Kentucky, 2000-10
Kentucky Injury Research and Research Center
December 1, 2012

The report examines statewide data, including the growing effects of prescription drug overdose on fatality rates, and the parallel rise in associated medical costs. The highest numbers of Kentucky drug overdose emergency visits involved opiates and benzodiazepines.

Read more:
http://www.mc.uky.edu/kiprc/PDF/Drug_Overdose_Morbidity_and_Mortality_in_Kentucky_2000_-_2010-final.pdf
 
 
Related Article
Drug Overdose Deaths Up 296 Percent From 2000 to 2010 in Kentucky
Lexington Herald-Leader
December 20, 2012
 
The number of drug overdose deaths in Kentucky increased 296 percent from 2000 to 2010, according to a study report. Prescription drugs were involved in 53 percent of deaths in 2010. 
 
Read more:
http://www.kentucky.com/2012/12/20/2451315/drug-overdose-deaths-up-296-percent.html 
 
 
Use of Prescription Opiates on Rise in Minnesota
CBS Minnesota
December 16, 2012

Legal distribution opioids increased by 72 percent statewide from 2005 to 2011, according to an investigation by the St. Paul Pioneer Press and Duluth News Tribune. Last year, 24 out of every 10,000 Minnesotans between ages 18 and 24 sought opiate addiction treatment--an increase of 179 percent from 4 years earlier.

Read more:
http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2012/12/16/use-of-prescription-opiates-on-rise-in-minnesota

 
Spike in Deaths From Fentanyl Overdoses
Sydney Morning Herald
December 13, 2012

According to this article, there have been at least 50 deaths linked to fentanyl medication since 2010, with a peak of 26 deaths in 2011. However, this total might rise; 32 deaths linked to the drug are still under investigation by the coroner. New data show users have discovered ways to extract the drug from the patch and inject it, while others are using multiple patches.

Read more:
http://www.smh.com.au/national/spike-in-deaths-from-fentanyl-overdoses-20121212-2b9w9.html

 
Rogue Pharmacists Fuel Addiction
Los Angeles Times
December 20, 2012

The article talks about doctors who provided massive amounts of painkillers and anti-anxiety drugs to addicts and dealers. California's 42,000 pharmacists filled 318 million prescriptions last year. Those for OxyContin, Dilaudid, and other potent painkillers have increased 52 percent over the last 5 years, according to a review of prescription data collected by the state.

Read more:
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-prescription-pharmacies-20121220,0,3760978.story

 
Better Sleep Means Better Health ...
Harvard Health Letter
December 2012

Long-term use of prescription sleep aids poses risks such as lingering daytime sleepiness. Other prescription medications may interfere as well. This article provides suggestions for getting better sleep, which is essential for good health.

Read more:
http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletters/Harvard_Health_Letter/2012/December/better-sleep-means-better-health-?utm_source=health&utm_medium=pressrelease&utm_campaign=health1212
 
 
Related Press Release
Prescription Drugs and Sleep Aids May Hurt Sleep
Harvard Health Letter
December 13, 2012

A brief press release discusses prescription sleep aids and other prescription medications that can interfere with sleep. According to a report in the December 2012 Harvard Health Letter, some prescription sleep aids (when taken for long periods of time) become less effective and actually interfere with sleep.

Read more:
http://www.prweb.com/releases/2012/12/prweb10194249.htm
 
 
Prescription Drugs: 'The New Killer for Young and Middle-Aged People'
Park Rapids Enterprise
December 21, 2012

The article uses national data to support its claim. According to the Centers for Disease Control, emergency department visits for prescription painkiller abuse or misuse have doubled in the past 5 years to nearly half a million. About 12 million American teens and adults reported using prescription painkillers to get "high" or for other nonmedical reasons.

Read more:
http://www.parkrapidsenterprise.com/event/article/id/35266

 
Medical Professionals Who Abuse Drugs Not Rare
Journal News
December 16, 2012

The article notes cases of medical professionals abusing prescription drugs. The American Nurses Association estimates 10 percent of nurses are dependent on drugs. "Access and stress are two of the main components," said Art Zwerling of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists Peer Assistance program.

Read more:
http://www.journal-news.com/news/news/medical-professionals-who-abuse-drugs-not-rare/nTXH5

 
Kentucky Officials Worry 'Crushable' Pain Pills Will Worsen Prescription Drug Addiction Woes
The Republic
December 16, 2012

Kentucky officials are concerned about generic versions of painkillers reaching the market without safeguards that make them harder to crush for a quick high. Patents for OxyContin and Opana ER are set to expire next year, paving the way for generic versions. They fear the generic versions of those painkillers won't feature some form of abuse deterrence.

Read more:
http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/59ec16dfc72041b1918e4c9247a0a47a/KY--Generics-Drug-Abuse

 
Hooked on Opiates: Doctors Face Quandary of Relieving Pain, Without Feeding Addiction
Pioneer Press
December 16, 2012

The author interviews doctors about how to deter 'doctor shopping,' cross-checking for abuse, education on opiate prescribing, and ensuring proper supply while limiting abuse.

Read more:
http://www.twincities.com/localnews/ci_22206597/opiate-abuse-doctors-face-quandary-relieving-pain-without

 
Northland Faces an Epidemic in Opiate Drug Addiction
Duluth News Tribune
December 16, 2012

An investigative report found more opioid painkillers are being distributed in the Northland and in Minnesota than in the past. Narcotic prescriptions used to combat pain nearly doubled from 2005 to 2011--enough oxycodone and hydrocodone to provide 18 pills for every man, woman, and child in Minnesota. In 1997, it was two pills per person. In addition, the number of Minnesotans seeking treatment for opiate addiction shot up more than 100 percent since 2007, according to data from the Department of Human Services.

Read more:
http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/event/article/id/253001

 
Nearly One Third of College Student Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions With Co-Occurring Mental Disorders Abuse Prescription Drugs
The TEDS Report, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
December 14, 2012

A recent study of college students identified links between nonmedical prescription drug use, depressive symptoms, and suicidality, and raised the possibility that "students may be inappropriately self-medicating psychological distress with prescription medications."

Read more:
http://www.samhsa.gov/data/spotlight/Spot094-College-Prescription-Drug-Use.pdf

 
FDA Announces Top Five Drugs Abused in Taiwan This Year
Tapei Times
December 16, 2012

The top five drugs abused in Taiwan in the first 10 months of this year were heroin, accounting for 66.8 percent of all substance abuse cases, followed by amphetamine and ketamine, which accounted for 33.1 percent and 5 percent, respectively. Zolpidem--a prescription medication used to treat insomnia--accounted for 4.3 percent of all drug abuse cases, while ecstasy represented 3.4 percent. The Food and Drug Administration warned the use of sleeping pills has increased over the past 6 years and that overreliance on such pills can lead to addiction.

Read more:
http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2012/12/16/2003550277

 
Interview With Dr. M. Bud Lateef, Founder of LOCKMED
TestCountry
Accessed December 20, 2012

Dr. M. Bud Lateef is a board certified physician trained in pain management. He is also the founder of LOCKMED, a company that designs products to restrict unauthorized access to prescription medication. LOCKMED's goal is to raise awareness about the importance of safeguarding medications. They work with a number of community drug coalitions and health departments nationwide.

Read more:
http://www.testcountry.com/content/interview-with-dr-lateef-lockmed.html

 
Oregon Finds Efforts to Treat Drug Addicts Paying Off
USA Today
December 17, 2012

The Oregon Health Authority spends about $51 million annually on substance abuse treatment--up $11 million from 6 years ago. The author compares Oregon's efforts with Kentucky's. For example, Oregon admitted more than twice as many addicts for treatment as Kentucky--48,833 compared with 21,474.

Read more:
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2012/12/17/oregon-addicts-treatment/1776773

 
2012 Drug and Alcohol Press Release: Text, Figures, and Tables
University of Michigan
Accessed December 20, 2012

University of Michigan provides the 2012 data tables from in-school surveys of 8th, 10th, and 12th grade students from the "Monitoring the Future Study."

Read more:
http://monitoringthefuture.org/data/12data.html#2012data-drugs
 
 
Related Press Release
The Rise in Teen Marijuana Use Stalls, Synthetic Marijuana Use Levels, and Use of 'Bath Salts' Is Very Low
University of Michigan News Service
December 19, 2012

The "Monitoring the Future Study" sampled 45,000 to 50,000 students in grades 8, 10, and 12. There was an increase in Adderall use and misuse among 12th graders. In 2012, 21.2 percent of students indicated they had used at least one prescription drug in their lifetime without a doctor's order, while 14.8 percent indicated such use in the past year. In the years 2009-12 combined, among past year users of amphetamines, the most prevalent sources for obtaining the drugs were "given by a friend" (55 percent), "bought from a friend" (44 percent), and "bought from a drug dealer or stranger" (20 percent).

Read more:
http://www.monitoringthefuture.org/pressreleases/12drugpr.pdf

Related Article
Marijuana Use Rising in High School Seniors: Report
Health Day
December 19, 2012

As it relates to prescription drugs, the report found Adderall (a treatment for attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder) use increased among high school seniors as the perception of its harm decreased. In addition, use of prescription narcotic painkillers declined.
 
Read more:
http://www.newsday.com/news/health/marijuana-use-rising-in-high-school-seniors-report-1.4354554 
 
 
Please e-mail Rekaya Gibson at rgibson@pire.org with questions or comments about the SAMHSA Prevention of Prescription Drug Abuse in the Workplace Listserv.  
 
 
About PAW and the Listserv
The PAW TA Center addresses prescription drug abuse--a growing public health problem with increasing burdens on workers, workplaces, and our economy. Prescription drug abuse affects workplace productivity and increases employee absenteeism, employee presenteeism, and workers' compensation claims. On a wider scale, overdose deaths linked to prescription opioids tripled from 1999 to 2006, and prescription drug abuse killed more Americans in 2009 than died that year in auto crashes.
 
Send your request for PAW technical assistance to PAW-TA@pire.org or contact Rekaya Gibson at 504.261.8107 or Deborah Galvin at 240.276.2721. Requests are subject to SAMHSA approval. You will be notified of the status of your request.
 
We aim to conduct systematic and inclusive searches of professional journals, leading newspapers and magazines, and federal websites, as well as contributions from listserv subscribers (please e-mail suggestions to rgibson@pire.org). We will send links to articles along with brief descriptions of those articles. As we develop the listserv, however, we hope to add commentary and invite feedback from subscribers. Our goal is to expand the listserv to become a widely used and recognized source of the most current and authoritative information on prescription drug abuse--especially in workplaces.
 

The "SAMHSA Prevention of Prescription Drug Abuse in the Workplace Listserv" is a service provided by the SAMHSA Preventing Prescription Abuse in the Workplace Technical Assistance Center (PAW) to keep the field abreast of recent news and journal articles to assist in forming policy, research, and programs to reduce prescription drug misuse or abuse. Please note, the materials listed are not reflective of SAMHSA's or PAW's viewpoints or opinions and are not assessed for validity, reliability, or quality. The "SAMHSA Prevention of Prescription Drug Abuse in the Workplace Listserv" should not be considered an endorsement of the findings. Readers are cautioned not to act on the results of single studies, but rather to seek bodies of evidence. Copyright considerations prevent PAW from providing full-text journal articles. 
 
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