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June 30, 2016

PAW Weekly Update

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SAMHSA
SAMHSA Prescription Drug Abuse Weekly Update
WEEKLY
UPDATE
Issue 180  |  June 30, 2016
The Prevention of Prescription Drug Abuse in the Workplace (PAW) TA Center addresses prescription drug abuse—a growing public health problem with increasing burdens on workers, workplaces, and our economy. To subscribe colleagues, family members, or friends to this listserv sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), please click here or send their e-mail addresses to paw@dsgonline.com.
Index
Featured
Journal Articles and Reports
Professional Opinion
Professional Development
National
Marijuana
International
Northeast/Mid-Atlantic News
South News
Midwest News
West News
Grant Award
Grant Announcements
Take-Back Events & Drop Boxes
Upcoming Events, Conferences & Workshops

Featured

Employers Grapple with Ban on Blanket Post-Injury Drug Testing
Allen Smith, Society for Human Resource Management
June 24, 2016

Effective August 10, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) will prohibit employers from using or threatening the use of drug testing as a form of adverse action against employees who report work-related injuries or illnesses. OSHA reassures employers that the rule does not ban drug testing, including pre-employment drug testing and random drug testing. Instead, OSHA says “drug testing policies should limit post-incident testing to situations in which employee drug use is likely to have contributed to the incident.” Employers will also be allowed to continue post-accident drug-testing when required by a workers’ compensation law. Mary LeAnn Mynatt, an attorney with the firm Baker Donelson, recommends that employers carefully evaluate their drug-testing policies, balance competing interests, and think through ramifications and requirements.

Read more:
https://www.shrm.org/legalissues/federalresources/pages/osha-blanket-post-injury-drug-testing.aspx

J.J. Palamar, J.A. Shearston, and C.M. Cleland. 2016. “Discordant Reporting of Nonmedical Opioid Use in a Nationally Representative Sample of US High School Seniors.” American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse: Encompassing All Addictive Disorders, doi:10.1080/00952990.2016.1178269.

Among the nationally representative sample of 31,149 American high school seniors in the Monitoring the Future study (2009–13), 37 percent of those reporting nonmedical Vicodin use and 28 percent of those reporting nonmedical OxyContin use did not report nonmedical opioid use. Factoring in these drugs, self-reported prevalence of nonmedical opioid use would increase from 8.3 percent to 11.6 percent (a 40 percent increase). Female respondents were more likely to provide a discordant response about Vicodin and highly religious students were more likely to provide a discordant response about OxyContin. Those who reported cocaine or nonmedical tranquilizer use were at consistently low odds for discordant responses. Nonmedical amphetamine users were at low odds for providing a discordant Vicodin response.

Read more:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00952990.2016.1178269

Journal Articles and Reports

C.A. Shaheed, C.G. Maher, K.A. Williams, R. Day, and A.J. McLachlan. 2016. “Efficacy, Tolerability, and Dose-Dependent Effects of Opioid Analgesics for Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.” JAMA Internal Medicine, doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.1251.

J.C. Ballantyne. 2016. Commentary, “Avoiding Opioid Analgesics for Treatment of Chronic Low Back Pain. “JAMA 315(22):2459-2460, doi:10.1001/jama.2016.6753.

A search of Medline and similar data bases identified 20 randomized clinical trials of opioid analgesic treatment for pain with a total of 7,925 participants. None enrolled patients with acute low back pain. Thirteen placebo-controlled trials (3,419 participants) evaluated short-term effects on chronic low back pain. In7 of these 13 trials, at least 50 percent of participants withdrew owing to adverse events or lack of efficacy, with more than 40 percent withdrawing in 3 more. In enrichment trials where participants entered the trial only if they tolerated and responded to the medicine in the run-in phase, 31–62 percent withdrew owing to adverse events and 3–30 percent withdrew owing to lack of efficacy. No study found a clinically important pain reduction, defined as a 20-point decline in pain score on a 0–100 scale. Moderate-quality evidence indicated opioid analgesics reduce pain at six weeks (-10 points). Meta-regression revealed a 12 point greater pain relief for every 1 log unit increase in morphine equivalent dose (P = .046) across a range between studies of 40–240-mg morphine equivalents per day. High-quality evidence from 6 studies (2,605 participants) showed that single-ingredient opioid analgesics reduced pain by 8 points at 12 weeks. No studies evaluated benefits beyond 12 weeks. The commentary in JAMA says these results are similar to prior reviews and meta-analyses. It concludes “the best way to reduce adverse outcomes is to stop prescribing opioids for common diagnoses like back pain because the available evidence shows they are not effective. It is not necessary to take any risk, however small, when the treatment is not effective and the consequences of adverse outcomes include potential serious harms to individuals, families, and society.”

Read more:
http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2522397
http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2528194

C.P. Carroll, S. Lanzkron, C. Haywood Jr., K. Kiley, M. Pejsa, G. Moscou-Jackson, J.A. Haythornthwaite, and C.M. Campbell. 2016. “Chronic Opioid Therapy and Central Sensitization in Sickle Cell Disease.” American Journal of Preventive Medicine 51(1):S69–77, doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2016.02.012.

Of 83 adult sickle cell disease patients seen at a Baltimore treatment center between January 2010 and June 2014, 29 were prescribed chronic opioid therapy for pain. The two groups did not differ on demographics or disease severity. Not controlling for any differences in chronic pain levels at intake, over 90 days post-intake, patients prescribed opioid therapy had more clinical pain (particularly non-crisis); central sensitization; depression and increased diary measures of pain severity, function, and healthcare utilization on crisis and non-crisis diary days, as well as a greater proportion of days in crisis.

Read more:
http://www.ajpmonline.org/article/S0749-3797(16)00092-1/abstract

D. Collins, B. Reed, Y. Zhang, and M.J. Kreek. 2016. “Sex Differences in Responsiveness to the Prescription Opioid Oxycodone in Mice.” Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, doi:10.1016/j.pbb.2016.06.006.

Among male and female mice injected with oxycodone, the time course of analgesia was similar, but the drug produced greater analgesia in male mice than in female mice at higher doses.

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S009130571630106X

L.A. Lina, M.A. Walton, E.E. Bonar, and F.C. Blow. 2016. “Trajectories of Nonmedical Use of Prescription Opioids among Adolescents in Primary Care.” Addiction Research & Theory, doi:10.1080/16066359.2016.1178244.

A randomized controlled trial in Michigan primary care clinics collected data at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months from 1076 low-income adolescents ages 12–18, primarily African–Americans (63 percent). Ninety percent (969) never used prescription opioids nonmedically, 6 percent used them but decreased their use over time, 4 percent were high-sustained users. Multinomial regression showed depressive symptoms and nonmedical sedative and stimulant use were associated with nonmedical opioid use.

Read more:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/16066359.2016.1178244

E. Meara, J.R. Horwitz, W. Powell, L. McClelland, W. Zhou, A.J. O’Malley, and N.E. Morden. 2016. “State Legal Restrictions and Prescription-Opioid Use Among Disabled Adults.” New England Journal of Medicine, doi:10.1056/NEJMsa1514387.

From 2006 through 2012, states added 81 controlled-substance laws. Analysis of 8.76 million person years of data for 2006–12 on Medicare fee-for-service disabled beneficiaries ages 21–64 found no significant associations between opioid outcomes and specific types of laws or the number of types enacted. In 2012, 47 percent of the beneficiaries studied filled opioid prescriptions (25 percent in one to three calendar quarters and 22 percent in every calendar quarter); 8 percent had four or more opioid prescribers; 5 percent had prescriptions yielding a daily morphine-equivalent dose exceeding 120 mg in any calendar quarter; and 0.3 percent were treated for a nonfatal prescription opioid overdose.

Read more:
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMsa1514387

S.G. Morgan, J. Hunt, J. Rioux, J. Proulx, D. Weymann, and C. Tannenbaum. 2016. “Frequency and Cost of Potentially Inappropriate Prescribing for Older Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study.” CMAJ, doi:10.9778/cmajo.20150131.

In 2013 National Prescription Drug Utilization Information System data for the six Canadian provinces with full data coverage (British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and Prince Edward Island), 37 percent of people over age 65 filled one or more prescriptions meeting the Beers Criteria for potentially inappropriate medication use. [Editor’s note: the Beers Criteria merely identify heavy usage and do not account for health status or age in doing that. Thus, this study’s findings are suspect and probably largely suggest that the Criteria become less valid with age.] Potentially inappropriate prescribing was most common among women aged 85 or more (47 percent). A higher proportion of women (42 percent) than men (31 percent) filled potentially inappropriate prescriptions, but this finding may merely reflect the greater proportion of women than men who were over age 85. An estimated $75 per older Canadian, or $419 million in total, was spent on potentially inappropriate medications outside of hospital settings in 2013. Benzodiazepines and other hypnotics were the leading contributors to potentially inappropriate prescribing.

Read more:
http://cmajopen.ca/content/4/2/E346

S.W. Patrick, C.E. Fry, T.F. Jones, and M.B. Buntin. 2016. “Implementation of Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs Associated With Reductions in Opioid-Related Death Rates.” Health Affairs, doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2015.1496.

In a time-series panel regression, state implementation of a prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) was associated with a significant average reduction of 1.12 opioid-related overdose deaths per 100,000 population in the year after implementation. Additionally, states whose programs had robust characteristics—including monitoring greater numbers of drugs with abuse potential and updating their data at least weekly—had greater reductions in deaths compared to states whose programs did not have these characteristics. A regression model suggests that 600 overdose deaths might have been prevented in 2016 if Missouri adopted a prescription PDMP and other states enhanced their programs with robust features.

Read more:
http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/early/2016/06/16/hlthaff.2015.1496

T.D. Saha, B.T. Kerridge, R.B. Goldstein, S.P. Chou, H. Zhang, J. Jung, R.P. Pickering, W.J. Ruan, S.M. Smith, B. Huang, D.S. Hasin, and B.F. Grant. 2016. “Nonmedical Prescription Opioid Use and DSM-5 Nonmedical Prescription Opioid Use Disorder in the United States.” Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 77(6):772–80, doi:10.4088/JCP.15m10386.

In 2012–13 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III (NESARC-III) data (n = 36,309), prevalence of 12-month and lifetime nonmedical prescription opioid use were 4.1 percent and 11.3 percent, respectively, exceeding rates in the 2001–02 NESARC (1.8 percent, 4.7 percent). Twelve-month and lifetime rates of DSM–V prescription opioid use disorder were 0.9 percent and 2.1 percent. NESARC-III DSM–IV disorder rates (0.8 percent, 2.9 percent) were double rates in the 2001–02 NESARC (0.4 percent and 1.4 percent). Usage rates, but not disorder rates, were greater among men than women. Use and disorder were generally high among respondents who were ages 18–64, white, Native American, and lower socioeconomic status. Nonmedical use and use disorders were associated with other drug use disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder, and a variety of mental health disorders. Only 5.5 percent of individuals with past-year prescription opioid use disorders were ever treated.

Read more:
http://www.psychiatrist.com/JCP/article/Pages/2016/v77n06/v77n0614.aspx
https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/rates-nonmedical-prescription-opioid-use-and-opioid-use-disorder-double-10

G. Tanda, M. Mereu, T. Hiranita, J. Quarterman, M. Coggiano, and J.L. Katz. 2016. “Lack of Specific Involvement of (+)-Naloxone and (+)-Naltrexone on the Reinforcing and Neurochemical Effects of Cocaine and Opioids.” Neuropsychopharmacology, doi:10.1038/npp.2016.91.

In rats, under a wide range of doses and experimental conditions, naloxone and naltrexone did not specifically block neurochemical or behavioral abuse-related effects of cocaine or opioids.

Read more:
http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/27296151

Professional Opinion

H.M. Finestone, D.N. Juurlink, B. Power, T. Gomes, and N. Pimlott. 2016. “Opioid Prescribing is a Surrogate for Inadequate Pain Management Resources.” Canadian Family Physician 62(6):465–8.

The authors argue that Canada’s opioid epidemic has been fueled both by inadequate pain management resources, and by the “unscrupulous marketing” of addictive pain relievers by the pharmaceutical industry. Canada needs to develop a more holistic approach to pain management that extends beyond opioids. The authors believe the government should finance a system that family physicians can refer patients for pain management services and are covered by public health insurance. They want to see an expansion of Ontario’s narcotics monitoring system, with the data available to family physicians so they can identify addicted patients or those abusing pain relievers. Furthermore, they want pain management to become an essential part of the curricula in medical schools, for both undergraduates and specialists. Healthcare professionals should advocate for better access to chronic pain resources in order to reduce opioid prescribing. Medical health plans need to put money up front and organize efficient and creative chronic pain interventions.

Read more:
http://www.cfp.ca/content/62/6/465.full?sid=1b6c8630-3263-49f1-a538-2e24d81e2fa8

S. Fitzgerald. 2016. “Should Training in Opioid Prescribing Be Mandatory?” Neurology Today 16(11):44–7, doi:10.1097/01.NT.0000484702.53376.b0.

Neurologists have mixed reactions to a recommendation by an FDA advisory panel to make physician training in opioid prescribing mandatory. For example, Gary Franklin, MD, supports mandatory opioid prescribing training because many doctors base their prescribing on out-of-date views on dosing and tolerance that they learned in medical school decades ago. Alan Carver, MD, a neurologist, worries that mandatory training courses on opioid prescribing could convey a one-size-fits-all approach that fails to respect the needs of the individual patient. He believes students and residents should be educated about pain management and palliative care from the beginning.

Read more:
http://journals.lww.com/neurotodayonline/Fulltext/2016/
06090/Should_Training_in_Opioid_Prescribing_Be.13.aspx

Professional Development

R. Denenberg and C.P. Curtiss. 2016. “CE: Appropriate Use of Opioids in Managing Chronic Pain.” American Journal of Nursing, doi:10.1097/01.NAJ.0000484931.50778.6f.

Read more:
http://journals.lww.com/ajnonline/Abstract/publishahead/
CE___Appropriate_Use_of_Opioids_in_Managing.99873.aspx


C. Grey, and P.B. Hall. 2016. “Considerations of Prescription Opioid Abuse and Misuse Among Older Adults in West Virginia—An Under-Recognized Population at Risk.” West Virginia Medical Journal 112(3):42–7.

Read more:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27301154

R.G. Mirick and S.A. Steenrod. 2016. “Opioid Use Disorder, Attachment, and Parenting: Key Concerns for Practitioners.” Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, doi:10.1007/s10560-016-0449-1.
Read more:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10560-016-0449-1

National

Questioning Employees About Prescription Drugs That Could Affect Performance and Safety
Joshua W. Solberg, McAfee & Taft
June 22, 2016

Policies and procedures requiring employees to disclose the lawful use of prescription drugs that can impair job performance may violate the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or guidelines issued by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). The EEOC has recently taken enforcement actions against employers on this issue. Employers should be aware of the hazards when requiring employees to disclose the use of prescription drugs. The ADA prohibits employers from making disability-related inquiries of applicants and employees unless the inquiry is job-related and consistent with business necessity. A disability-related inquiry could include a mandatory disclosure by or conversation with employees concerning prescription drugs they are taking. The EEOC has a three-part test to determine when an employer may require employees to disclose prescription medication use. To require disclosure, each of the three elements must be established: 1) the employer must be one that affects public safety; 2) the employee must be in a position that affects public safety; and 3) the nature of the medication required to be reported must be one that affects the employee’s ability to perform essential functions, resulting in a direct threat. Enforcement actions by the EEOC may result in monetary settlements, policy changes, and training. The author recommends that employers train human resource professionals and supervisors regarding employees’ rights and obligations under the ADA and other state and federal laws that provide protection to employees, specifically in the area of prescription drugs. He also recommends that employers review and, if necessary, revise handbooks, policies, and procedures pertaining to the mandatory disclosure of prescription drug use. [Editor’s note: Weekly Update has not verified the accuracy of the legal opinions stated in this article.]

Read more:
http://www.hrhero.com/hl/articles/2016/06/22/questioning-employees-about-prescription-drugs-that-could-affect-performance-and-safety

Charges Dropped Against FedEx Related to Illegal Distribution of Prescription Drugs
National Association of Boards of Pharmacy
June 22, 2016

The U.S. Department of Justice has dropped charges against FedEx Corporation related to knowingly shipping illegal online prescription drugs. This decision came after federal prosecutors reviewed the evidence in the case. FedEx could have been fined up to $1.6 billion.

Read more:
http://www.nabp.net/news/us-department-of-justice-drops-charges-related-to-illegal-distribution-of-prescription-drugs-against-fedex

The President on Making Sure Americans Can Get Lifesaving Treatment
Michael Botticelli, White House
June 22, 2016

In his reply to a letter from a Pennsylvania mother, President Obama emphasizes the need for additional funding to respond to the opioid epidemic. The mother wrote that access to treatment had kept her son alive and put him on the road to recovery from a heroin use disorder. This article includes both letters.

Read more:
https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2016/06/22/president-writes-about-his-fight-make-sure-americans-can-get-lifesaving-treatment

Nearly a Third on Medicare Got Commonly Abused Opioids
Carla K. Johnson, Associated Press
June 22, 2016

Nearly 12 million Medicare beneficiaries received at least one prescription for an opioid pain reliever in 2015 at a cost of $4.1 billion, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s Office of the Inspector General. Medicare implemented a monitoring system in 2013 that provides quarterly reports to Part D plan sponsors on high-risk beneficiaries who may be overusing commonly misused drugs. The system flagged 15,651 beneficiaries in 2015 as potential problem drug users. In 2017, the federal government will bar payment for prescriptions written by doctors who are not enrolled in Medicare.

Read more:
http://www.startribune.com/nearly-1-in-3-on-medicare-got-commonly-abused-opioids/383965421/

Heroin Use in United States Reaches ‘Alarming’ 20-Year High
Mary Brophy Marcus, CBS News
June 23, 2016

The United Nations (UN) Office on Drugs and Crime World Drug Report 2016 says that heroin use has reached its highest level in 20 years in the United States. The report found that heroin is the deadliest drug worldwide. In addition to the United States, heroin use and related overdose deaths increased sharply over the last 2 years in parts of western and central Europe, despite a sharp decline globally in opium production in 2015.

Read more:
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/heroin-use-in-u-s-reaches-alarming-20-year-high

American Medical Association Says Pain Should Not Be the Fifth Vital Sign
Kelley Malcolm, Nonprofit Quarterly
June 21, 2016

At its recent annual meeting, the American Medical Association recommended that “pain” be removed from the panel of vital signs for which patients are assessed. Assessing a patient’s level of pain as a vital sign became common practice in the mid-1990s. Patients self-measured their level of pain, rating it on a scale of 1 to 10. The goal was to reduce the rating of pain to zero. Some worry, however, that physicians will ignore patients’ pain altogether.

Read more:
https://nonprofitquarterly.org/2016/06/21/american-medical-association-says-pain-shouldnt-be-the-fifth-vital-sign

The Deadly Triangle: Dentists, Drugs, and Dependence
Kate Snow and Parminder Deo, NBC News
June 21, 2016

Brittany Ringersen had her wisdom teeth removed when she was a teenager. The dentist prescribed her a 30-day supply of Percocet but failed to warn her that the drug could be addictive. Ringersen continued taking the Percocet because it felt good and extra pills were left in the bottle. In less than a month, Ringersen became a drug addict for 4 years. After 7 years clean and sober, Ringersen started the Lighthouse Recovery Institute, where she works with young patients hooked on pain relievers that a dentist prescribed. Paul Moore, DMD, Ph.D., professor of pharmacology and anesthesiology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, noted that as many as half of all dental patients can get effective relief from an over-the-counter pain medicine. The problem is, not knowing which patients those are. At the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, students are trained to give their surgical patients a detailed explanation of the best way to take and dispose of medication. They write 2-week opioid prescriptions that are not refillable. (Includes video: 2:24 minutes)

Read more:
http://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/deadly-triangle-dentists-drugs-dependence-n596601

Random Drug Testing Benefits Employers
Steve Beller, Quest Diagnostics
June 15, 2016

The 2014 Quest Diagnostics Drug Testing Index shows that random urine drug test positivity rates are higher (5.7 percent) than they are for pre-employment (4.0 percent) or periodic (1.6 percent) tests. The author recommends that employers adopt reliable, repeatable processes to ensure accuracy and fairness for their program’s employee selection process.

Read more:
http://blog.employersolutions.com/random-drug-testing-benefits-employers

How Nursing Helps Combat the Opioid Epidemic
Ruth Tarantine, Huffington Post
June 23, 2016

Over the past 3 months, more than 200 schools of nursing with advanced practice registered nurse programs have pledged to educate their students on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain. Deborah Trautman, president and CEO of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, encourages consumers who suffer from addiction to seek the expertise of nurses to help find available treatment options and community services.

Read more:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ruth-tarantine-dnp-rn/how-nursing-is-helping-to_b_10637130.html

As with Prince, Baby Boomers’ Chronic Pain Means Risk of Opioid Abuse
Tony Pugh, Kansas City Star
June 22, 2016

The musician Prince’s fentanyl overdose reflects a larger problem for baby boomers ranging in age from 51 through 69. In Florida alone, people 50 and older accounted for 121 of the state’s 274 oxycodone overdose deaths in the first six months of last year. As baby boomers age, they are likely to develop aliments and use prescription opioids for chronic pain. This puts them at risk of an overdosing or dying. They may see several doctors who prescribe different medications simultaneously. When those drugs interact, they can cause adverse effects such as accidental poisoning. Also, mixing alcohol or street drugs with prescription medications can cause users to overdose or die. (Includes video: 1:28 minutes)

Read more:
http://www.kansascity.com/news/nation-world/national/article85026407.html

The Chinese Connection Fueling America’s Fentanyl Crisis
Jeanne Whalen and Brian Spegele, Wall Street Journal
June 23, 2016

A Chinese network feeds fentanyl to the United States, Mexico, and Canada. The network avoids efforts to stop it by trading related products subject to little or no regulation in China or internationally. These include variants of fentanyl known as analogs, or the chemical ingredients and pill presses used to produce the drug. Fentanyl and its analogs are also being purchased online by small-time traffickers in the United States and Canada. Canada’s federal health department is now “actively looking into the issue of pill presses as part of a comprehensive approach” to combat opioid misuse. China prohibits the nonmedical sale of fentanyl, and last fall, it added several analogs including acetyl fentanyl to a list of controlled narcotics. Some Chinese companies export illicit batches of these narcotics anyway. Others have begun shipping fentanyl analogs that are not yet subject to regulation. The Drug Enforcement Administration warns about a flood of counterfeit pills hitting the United States, which resemble legal medications but actually contain fentanyl. Chinese shippers often label pill presses as other goods or break them into pieces to try to evade U.S. regulation.

Read more:
http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-chinese-connection-fueling-americas-fentanyl-crisis-1466618934

Marijuana

C. Aydin, P.G. Tibbo, and Z. Ursuliak. 2016. “Psychosocial Interventions in Reducing Cannabis Use in Early Phase Psychosis: A Canadian Survey of Treatments Offered.” Canadian Journal of Psychiatry 61(6):367–2, doi:10.1177/0706743716639931.

Of 35 Canadian English-speaking early intervention services for psychosis polled online or by e-mail, 27 (78 percent) responded. Twelve percent offered cannabis interventions and 63 percent had informal services that addressed all substance use risks. In programs with informal services, individual patient psychoeducation (86 percent) was most common, followed by individual motivational interviewing (76 percent), group patient psychoeducation (52 percent), and information handouts (52 percent). Thirty-seven percent offered formal services for substance use, and those often included cognitive-behavioral therapy and family services in individual rather than group treatment. No service used contingency management. Service implementation barriers included appropriate training and administrative support.

Read more:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27254846

A.G. Brellenthin and K.F. Koltyn. 2016. “Exercise as an Adjunctive Treatment for Cannabis Use Disorder.” American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse: Encompassing All Addictive Disorders, doi:10.1080/00952990.2016.1185434

Researchers reviewed the evidence surrounding cannabis use and its current treatment in the United States, explored the rationale for including exercise in the treatment of substance use disorders, and proposed a biological mechanism (endocannabinoids) that might cause exercise to help in treating cannabis use disorder.

Read more:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00952990.2016.1185434

L. Coucke, E. Massarini, Z. Ostijn, O. Beck, and A.G. Verstraete. 2016. “Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Concentrations in Exhaled Breath and Physiological Effects Following Cannabis Intake—A Pilot Study Using Illicit Cannabis.” Clinical Biochemistry, doi:10.1016/j.clinbiochem.2016.06.003.

Among nine men and four women, breath testing detected Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) for 3 hours after smoking one joint. The THC concentration in exhaled breath was related to pulse rate and the pupil diameter changes that occur during the first half hour after smoking.

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0009912016300996

Legislation Would Facilitate Research on the Medical Value of Marijuana
Orin Hatch, United States Senate for Utah
June 20, 2016

Senators have introduced the Marijuana Effective Drug Studies Act of 2016, a bipartisan bill that would make it easier for researchers to conduct clinical studies on the medical benefits of marijuana. The act removes redundancies in the process for obtaining Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) approval to conduct research and enabling researchers to amend and supplement research proposals without reapplying for approval; eliminating the frequently imposed DEA requirement that marijuana be kept in bolted safes; codifying current DEA regulations that allow marijuana to be stored in securely locked, substantially constructed cabinets; directing DEA to license additional marijuana manufacturers for the purpose of scientific research and drug development; and instructing the agency to establish manufacturing licenses for the commercial production of FDA-approved medical marijuana products.

Read more:
http://www.hatch.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/releases?ID=1C6410CC-6287-4419-ABE2-08A42471812D

Wisconsin Representative Supports Medical Marijuana Option for Vets
Larry Lee, WSAU
June 20, 2016

Rep. Ron Kind (D–Wisc.) supports creating a supervised medical marijuana program for veterans’ pain management. In May, both houses of Congress agreed to an amendment to the 2017 appropriations bill that would allow veterans access to supervised medical marijuana. However, the bill may not survive the budget process.

Read more:
http://wsau.com/news/articles/2016/jun/20/kind-supports-supervised-veterans-medical-marijuana-option

Updating Your Employee Handbook for 2016
Tracey Diamond, Pepper Hamilton LLP
June 20, 2016

Employee handbooks are an important way for employers to communicate rules, expectations, and benefits to employees. If the company’s employee handbook is out of date, it can become a liability, rather than an asset. Employers should pay attention to hot-button employment law topics when making handbook revisions. For example, employers should review their policies against smoking in the workplace to account for changes in state laws involving marijuana use (both medical and nonmedical) and the increased use of e-cigarettes. Policies should state that employees are prohibited from using or being under the influence of marijuana in the workplace. Drug-testing policies also should be revised to deal with employees who test positive for marijuana and claim a medicinal need for the drug. Workplace smoking policies should state that e-cigarettes are treated like other tobacco products.

Read more:
http://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/updating-your-employee-handbook-for-2016-52303

Medical Marijuana Debate Begins Long Before Legislative Session
Jane Caffrey, KRISTV
June 20, 2016

Two Texas legislators want to expand a 2015 medical marijuana law to more patients. Currently, the law allows limited use of medical cannabis to treat epilepsy. The first permits for medical marijuana dispensaries are scheduled to be granted next summer. (Includes video 1:41 minutes)

Read more:
http://www.kristv.com/story/32265919/medical-marijuana-debate-begins-long-before-legislative-session

Ex-Cops Caution New Zealand on Medicinal Marijuana after Testing ‘Farcical’ California System
ONE News
Accessed June 21, 2016

Kirk Hardy and Glen Dobson, former New Zealand police officers, went undercover to film how easy it is to buy medicinal marijuana in California. It warns New Zealand to proceed with caution if it is to legalize medicinal marijuana. The officers say had no idea that California’s medical marijuana system was filled with abuse. Hardy believes there should be a strict division between medicinal and nonmedicinal cannabis being prescribed. (Includes videos: 4:42 minutes | 0:30 minutes)

Read more:
https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/ex-cops-caution-nz-medicinal-marijuana-after-testing-farcical-california-system

International

Ghana Health Minister to Pharmacists: Don’t Abuse Drugs
Ghana Web
June 24, 2016

Ghana’s minister of health reported an increase in drug misuse among health workers. At an induction ceremony of over 300 newly qualified and registered pharmacists in Accra, he urged them not to misuse the drugs they sell.

Read more:
http://www.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePage/health/Health-Minister-to-pharmacists-Don-t-abuse-drugs-450201

Health Canada: Strict Conditions on Medicine for First Nations Similar to Provinces
Joanna Smith, Canadian Press
June 23, 2016

Health Canada restricts access to some prescription mental-illness drugs for on-reserve patients based on the same expert advice that guides other publicly funded pharmacare programs nationwide. It is up to each jurisdiction whether or not to follow the advice. Cornelia Wieman, MD, a psychiatrist who has worked on First Nations reserves, noted that Health Canada will not cover some prescriptions for antipsychotics unless the patient has tried other drugs first. Dr. Wieman believes Health Canada should focus on the needs of the population it is serving, rather than comparing its decisions to other plans.

Read more:
http://www.ctvnews.ca/health/strict-conditions-on-medicine-for-first-nations-similar-to-provinces-health-canada-says-1.2957983

Northeast/Mid-Atlantic News

New York Governor Signs Legislation Combating Heroin and Opioid Addiction
Amanda Farinacci, Time Warner Cable News
June 22, 2016

New York’s governor has signed legislation that will allow medical professionals to make treatment decisions instead of insurance companies. It allows a 72-hour stay for emergency overdose treatment, up from 48 hours and creates 2,500 slots in outpatient treatment programs. It also limits pain reliever prescriptions to 7 days, down from 30.

Read more:
http://www.ny1.com/nyc/all-boroughs/news/2016/06/22/cuomo-visits-staten-island-to-sign-legislation-combating-heroin-and-opioid-addiction.html

New Maryland Law Looks to Monitor Prescription Drug Use
Jobina Fortson, WMDT
June 10, 2016

Medical practitioners in Maryland who are authorized to prescribe controlled and dangerous substances must register with the state’s prescription drug monitoring program by October 1, according to a new state law. By July 1, 2018, use will be mandatory before prescribing any type of controlled or dangerous substance. Under the law, anyone can report an overdose and not face legal repercussions. (Includes video: 3:05 minutes)

Read more:
http://www.wmdt.com/news/more-local-news/New-law-looks-to-monitor-prescription-drug-use/40145008

Pennsylvania Governor Asks for $34 Million to Fight Heroin, Opioid Abuse
Jason Addy, Politics PA
June 20, 2016

Pennsylvania’s governor has urged legislators to approve $34 million to build 50 heroin and opioid abuse treatment centers. If approved, the state will be able to bring in an additional $18 million in federal funding for the construction project.

Read more:
http://www.politicspa.com/pa-bgt-wolf-asks-for-34m-to-fight-heroin-opioid-abuse/76296

Pennsylvania House Passes 2 Bills to Fight Opioid Abuse
Myles Snyder, WHTM
June 23, 2016

Pennsylvania’s house of representatives has passed two bills aimed at reducing misuse of prescription pain relievers. One bill requires health insurance plans to cover opioids with abuse deterrents that make the pills harder to crush or inject. The other bill prohibits doctors from prescribing more than seven days of opioids in an emergency department or urgent care center unless more than a 7-day supply is required. Doctors would have to document the condition triggering the prescription and indicate why a non-opioid drug was inappropriate. Both bills moved to the state’s senate for consideration.

Read more:
http://abc27.com/2016/06/23/pa-house-passes-2-bills-to-fight-opioid-abuse

Pennsylvania Lawmaker Wants to Sue ‘Big Pharma’ Over Opiate Epidemic
By Steve Esack and Colt Shaw, Morning Call
June 17, 2016

A member of Pennsylvania’s house of representatives has introduced a resolution that calls on the governor and attorney general to file a civil lawsuit “against pharmaceutical companies responsible for causing the opioid epidemic.” The resolution states: “Certain pharmaceutical companies mislead the public about the addictiveness of the powerful prescription opioid drugs and are engaged in fraud, conspiracy and negligence in the development and marketing of these drugs.”

Read more:
http://www.mcall.com/news/nationworld/pennsylvania/mc-pa-drug-company-lawsuit-resolution-20160617-story.html

Titusville (Pa.) School Board Adopts Policy on Medicine Used to Reverse Overdose
Joshua Sterling, Titusville Herald
June 21, 2016

The Titusville Area (Pa.) School District has approved a policy to allow school officials to administer naloxone. The district has not had an incident take place, but officials prefer to have naloxone on hand just in case. The state is offering the antidote free to school districts.

Read more:
http://www.titusvilleherald.com/news/article_7d8538ea-3765-11e6-93fc-e7126831923d.html

South News

Virginia Governor Signs Bills to Prevent Opioid Abuse
WVIR-TV
June 23, 2016

Virginia’s governor has signed bills into law that require doctors prescribing pain relievers to update the prescription drug monitoring program within 24 hours beginning in January 2017 and to check it any time they write a prescription for pain relievers for more than 14 days. (Includes video: 1:46 minutes)

Read more:
http://www.nbc29.com/story/32294562/gov-terry-mcauliffe-signs-bills-to-prevent-opiod-abuse

Overdose Reversal Drug Now Much Easier to Get in North Carolina
Jonathan Rodriquez, WNCN
June 20, 2016

North Carolina’s governor has signed legislation making naloxone available without a prescription. North Carolina is the third state in the country to issue a standing prescription order statewide for naloxone. Since 2013, the NC Harm Reduction Coalition has distributed over 28,000 free naloxone kits to community members, resulting in 3,316 reported administrations. More than 70 law enforcement agencies now carry naloxone. (Includes video: 1:13 minutes)

Read more:
http://wncn.com/2016/06/20/overdose-reversal-drug-now-much-easier-to-get-in-nc

71-Year-Old Virginian Pleads Guilty to Drug Distribution, Witness Tampering, and Fraud
Department of Justice, U.S. Attorney’s Office, Western District of Virginia
June 21, 2016

Gordon Reaves Parker, 71, who used a drug rehabilitation program in the Roanoke City (Va.) jail to obtain sex partners in exchange for drugs, pled guilty to federal charges related to drug distribution, witness tampering, and healthcare fraud. Parker made contact with at least 10 women ages18–27, many of whom he met while they were in jail in the drug program. When the women were released from jail, they visited Parker at his home, where he offered the women prescription opiates or heroin and large monetary gifts in exchange for sex. The drugs were prescribed by a pain management physician for his disabled wife.

Read more:
https://www.justice.gov/usao-wdva/pr/71-year-old-pleads-guilty-prescription-and-heroin-drug-distribution-witness-tampering

Two Drug Wholesalers Settle in West Virginia Pill Shipment Lawsuit
Exponent Telegram
June 23, 2016

KeySource Medical and Associated Pharmacies have agreed to settle a lawsuit alleging that they shipped an excessive number of prescription opioids to West Virginia. The lawsuit alleges that, between 2007 and 2012, Associated Pharmacies shipped 2.7 million doses of hydrocodone and 266,700 oxycodone pills to West Virginia. During the same period, KeySource Medical allegedly distributed 1.2 million hydrocodone pills and 905,000 oxycodone tablets. The Boone Circuit judge is allowing companies that settle with the attorney general’s office to keep secret information about pill shipments to specific pharmacies in southern West Virginia.

Read more:
http://www.theet.com/news/more-drug-wholesalers-settle-in-pill-shipment-lawsuit/article_3468ac0b-56da-5142-82db-732191eda541.html

West Virginia Health Officials Issue Warning about Deadly ‘Fake Xanax’
Kaitlynn LeBeau, WSAZ
June 22, 2016

West Virginia health officials are warning individuals about Xanax laced with fentanyl circulating in the state. The counterfeit Xanax can be potent and could possibility cause death if taken. There have been confirmed cases in Ohio, Florida, Illinois, and California, but not in West Virginia. Officials warn people not to buy Xanax off the street, instead get the real ones from pharmacy chains with a prescription. People who have fake Xanax should dispose of it immediately, especially if there are children in the home. (Includes video: 2:56 minutes)

Read more:
http://www.wsaz.com/content/news/WVa-health-officials-issue-warning-about-deadly-fake-Xanax-384032081.html

West Virginia Pharmacy School to Educate Students on Prescription Drug Abuse
Marshall University
June 17, 2016

The Marshall University School of Pharmacy in West Virginia has joined national efforts to educate student pharmacists on prescription drug misuse. Faculty will train students about naloxone and teach them how to counsel patients and their families about the medication.

Read more:
http://www.huntingtonnews.net/138596

Midwest News

Jackson County (Mo.) Aims to Track Opioid Drug Abuse
Mike Hendricks, Kansas City Star
June 20, 2016

Jackson County, Mo., legislators have voted unanimously to create a prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP). The county hopes to have the program running by year’s end. The PDMP would apply countywide with the exceptions of Kansas City and Independence. The resolution urges them to join in, and Kansas City is considering it. Missouri is the only state without a PDMP.

Read more:
http://www.kansascity.com/news/politics-government/article84828417.html

Missouri Bill to Make Opioid Overdose Antidote More Available Becomes Law
Mike Lear, Missourinet.com
June 22, 2016

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon signed a bill into law that will let pharmacists sell naloxone. Two years ago, the governor signed a bill allowing first responders to administer naloxone to overdose patients.

Read more:
https://www.missourinet.com/2016/06/22/missouri-bill-to-make-opioid-overdose-antidote-more-available-becomes-law

Indiana Task Force Releases Guidelines Aimed at Combating Prescription Drug Abuse
Brittany Lew, WISH
June 22, 2016

The Indiana governor’s Task Force on Drug Enforcement, Treatment, and Prevention has endorsed opioid and controlled substance prescribing guidelines for emergency departments. The guidelines were developed by the Indiana Hospital Association and the Indiana State Medical Association. They urge emergency room doctors to limit prescriptions to five-day supplies. They also discourage prescribing the drugs to people with known addiction or abuse issues. Doctors should not provide replacements for drugs that were lost, destroyed or stolen. Emergency room doctors also have the right to drug-test patients. (Includes video: 1:14 minutes)

Read more:
http://wishtv.com/2016/06/22/gov-pences-drug-task-force-announces-new-opioid-prescription-guidelines

Commission Created to Hinder Prescription Drug, Opioid Abuse in Michigan
Jon Szerlag, WSYM
June 23, 2016

A 17-member commission was created to monitor indicators of controlled substance abuse and diversion in Michigan. The commission will also make recommendations to the governor for actions involving licensing, law enforcement, substance abuse treatment and prevention, education, professional associations and pharmaceutical manufacturers. It will serve as an advisory board in the executive office and review recommendations from the state’s Prescription Drug and Opioid Abuse Task Force. (Includes video: 22 seconds)

Read more:
http://www.fox47news.com/news/local-news/commission-created-to-hinder-prescription-drug-opioid-abuse-in-michigan

Michigan Medical Society President Focuses on Opioid Abuse, Recertification Mandate
Jay Greene, Crain’s Detroit Business
June 17, 2016

David Krhovsky, MD, president of the Michigan State Medical Society, wants to see stronger measures taken to reduce opioid deaths, overdose, and misuse problems in the state. He calls for an overhaul of the state prescription drug monitoring program, which is outdated, slow, and not user friendly. Dr. Krhovsky recently testified before a Michigan senate health policy committee on legislation that would increase penalties for physicians who overprescribe controlled substances. Legislation would increase the penalty from a misdemeanor punishable by two years in prison to a felony, punishable by up to 15 years in prison.

Read more:
http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article/20160617/NEWS/160619810/new-msms-president-focuses-on-fixing-opioid-abuse-fights

Nebraska Health Department Has a Plan to Prevent Overdoses
Associated Press, KOLN-TV
June 20, 2016

Nebraska’s governor has released “Real Improvements, Sustainable Progress, Better Lives for Nebraskans,” a plan by the state’s health department that includes priorities and goals through June 2017. One priority is to expand prescription drug monitoring program use to prevent overdoses.

Read more:
http://www.wowt.com/content/news/Department-of-Health-and-Human-Services-has-a-plan-383665461.html

West News

Medicine Disposal Program on Hold: California Board of Pharmacy Considers New Regulations
Bill Silverfarb, Daily Journal
June 20, 2016

The California Board of Pharmacy put the drug disposal ordinance that was approved by the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors on hold. The board plans to consider regulations to allow pharmacies to serve as take-back locations for unwanted or unused medicine. Alameda, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara and Marin counties have all passed ordinances that require the pharmaceutical industry to pay for retail pharmacies to host drug take-back programs. However, the laws cannot be implemented until the counties get regulatory direction from the state. The board will prepare draft regulations for public comment leading up to its next board meeting late next month.

Read more:
http://www.smdailyjournal.com/articles/lnews/2016-06-20/147689

New Mexico Ranks Second in United States for Drug Overdose Deaths
Nancy Laflin, KOAT
June 21, 2016

New Mexico ranks second in the nation for drug overdose deaths. Fewer than 500 individuals died of overdoses in 2015 and about 540 in 2014. U.S. Attorney Damon Martinez believes for every overdose death, there are 125 abusers. Two years ago, there were 23 pharmacy robberies in New Mexico. After the federal government started prosecuting pharmacy robberies, they dropped dramatically. (Includes video: 1:29 minutes)

Read more:
http://www.koat.com/news/nm-ranks-second-in-the-us-for-drug-overdose-deaths/40139646

State Warns Utahans About Potential Dangers of Fentanyl
Lauren Steinbrecher, Fox 13
June 17, 2016

Utah warns residents that Fentanyl can harm anyone who touches it and can be deadly. Fentanyl can be hard to detect, and differentiate. The drug is 100 times more potent than morphine. Fentanyl is available by prescription in the form of transdermal patches, pills, lozenges and lollipops. (Includes video: 1:59 minutes)

Read more:
http://fox13now.com/2016/06/17/state-warns-utahns-about-potential-dangers-of-drug-100-times-more-potent-than-morphine

New Funding for Nevada Specialty Courts Aimed at Keeping You Sober and Out of Jail
Terri Hendry, KRNV
June 21, 2016

The Judicial Council of the State of Nevada approved $3 million in funding for 34 specialty courts statewide. In Reno, the money will be earmarked for a youth offender drug court. In Sparks, the funding will go toward a drug court focusing on alcohol and other drugs.

Read more:
http://mynews4.com/news/local/new-funding-for-specialty-courts-aimed-at-keeping-you-sober-and-out-of-jail

Grant Award

CVS Awards Virginia Sheriff’s Office with Grant for Drug Disposal/Collection Program
Brunswick Times-Gazette
June 21, 2016

The Brunswick County (Va.) Sheriff’s Office was awarded a grant from CVS Pharmacy to implement a drug disposal and collection initiative.

Read more:
http://www.brunswicktimes-gazette.com/news/article_7bc16da4-37d2-11e6-93d9-2f38d6c5dfe1.html

Grant Announcements

Safety and Outcome Measures of Pain Medications Used in Children and Pregnant Women (R03) | (R01) | (R21)
National Institutes of Health
Due: Oct. 16, 2016 | Jan. 7, 2020 | Jan. 7, 2020
Read more (R03):
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-16-313.html
Read more (R01):
http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=284425
Read more (R21):
http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=284428

Enhanced State Surveillance of Opioid-Involved Morbidity and Mortality
National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
Due: June 27, 2016
http://www.grants.gov/view-opportunity.html?oppId=283253

Data Resource for Post-Marketing Prescription Drug Abuse Surveillance Data from Individuals Entering or Being Assessed for Substance Abuse
FDA
Due: July 1, 2016, 4:30 p.m. (ET)
https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=
54ad333298f660fddb7c57a1e4ba7882&tab=core&_cview=0


Safety and Outcome Measures of Pain Medications Used in Children and Pregnant Women (R03) | (R01) | (R21)
National Institutes of Health
Due: Oct. 16, 2016 | Jan. 7, 2020 | Jan. 7, 2020
Read more (R03):
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-16-313.html
Read more (R01):
http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=284425
Read more (R21):
http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=284428

Bottle Tracking Program
National Association of Drug Diversion Investigators
Due: None Specified
http://www.naddi.org/aws/NADDI/pt/sp/programs_grants
http://naddibottletracking.org/law-enforcement/

Take-Back Events & Drop Boxes

New Safe Prescription Drug Disposal for Santa Barbara County (Calif.)
KSBY
June 22, 2016
http://www.ksby.com/story/32286803/new-safe-prescription-drug-disposal-for-santa-barbara-county

Round Up Program in Nevada Collects Excess Meds from Community
Anh Gray, KUNR
June 22, 2016
http://kunr.org/post/round-program-collects-excess-meds-community#stream/0

Medication Disposal Now Available in Silver City (N.M.)
Silver City Sun-News
June 20, 2016
http://www.scsun-news.com/story/news/local/community/2016/06/20/medication-disposal-now-available-silver-city/86150290

Centre County (Pa.) Drug Boxes
WATM
June 21, 2016
http://www.abc23.com/News/NewsDetails.asp?NewsID=20538

Elizabeth Township (Pa.) Drug Drop-Off Box Available at Municipal Building
Township of Elizabeth
June 21, 2016
http://elizabethtownshippa.com/etpd-prescription-drug-drop-off-box-available-at-the-municipal-building

Prescription Drug Disposal Available at Multiple Sites in South Carolina
Rebecca Rider, Salisbury Post
June 21, 2016
http://www.salisburypost.com/2016/06/21/down-the-hatch-medication-disposal-available

Upcoming Events, Conferences, & Workshops

CADCA’s 15th Annual Mid-Year Training Institute
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America
July 17–21, 2016
The Mirage
3400 S Las Vegas Blvd
Las Vegas, Nev.

At the CADCA Mid-Year, participants will learn strategies that will help them build strength and fortitude to deal with the communities’ toughest substance abuse challenges. Relevant workshops include: Prescribing Some Solutions to Prescription Pain Medicine Abuse; Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention for Community Coalitions; Understanding and Combatting the 3rd Great Epidemic: A Law Enforcement and Community Partnership Response to the Heroin and Opioid Crisis; Marijuana, Public Safety and Drugged Driving; The Naked Truth about Marijuana and Marijuana Legalization in Colorado—The Impact; and Measuring Marijuana’s Impact Locally: Trends & the 8 Enforcement Priority Areas.

Read more:
http://www.cadca.org/events/15th-annual-mid-year-training-institute

Register:
http://www.cadca.org/events/15th-annual-mid-year-training-institute/registration

Harold Rogers Prescription Drug Monitoring Program National Meeting
Bureau of Justice Assistance, and Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Training and Technical Assistance Center at Brandeis University
Aug. 17–19, 2016
Washington, D.C.

Register:
http://www.pdmpassist.org/content/ttac-meeting-registration-form

National Conference on Addiction Disorders: Taking Recovery to New Heights
Vendome Healthcare Media
Aug. 18–21, 2016
Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel
Denver, Colo.
https://vendome.swoogo.com/ncad-2016/home

Register:
https://vendome.swoogo.com/ncad-2016/begin

2016 Annual Conference
International Health Facility Diversion Association
Sept. 13–14, 2016
Cincinnati, Ohio
https://ihfda.org/2016-annual-conference

Register:
https://www.regonline.com/Register/Checkin.aspx?EventID=1803476

Twenty-Ninth Annual National Prevention Network Conference
National Prevention Network
Sept. 13–15, 2016
Buffalo, N.Y.
http://www.npnconference.org

Register:
http://www.npnconference.org/registration

2016 Conference: Saving Lives: Access to Improved Health & Recovery
American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence
Oct. 29 – Nov. 2, 2016
Baltimore, Md.
http://www.aatod.org/national-conference/2016-aatod-conference-baltimore

Register:
http://www.aatod.org/national-conference/2016-aatod-conference-baltimore/register-now

Bridging the Gaps: Reducing Prescription Drug and Opioid Abuse and Misuse Summit
National Association of Attorneys General and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials
Nov. 14–16, 2016
Arlington, Va.
http://www.naag.org/nagtri/nagtri-courses/national/bridging-the-gaps-reducing-prescription-drug-and-opioid-abuse-and-misuse-summit.php

National Rx Drug Abuse & Heroin Summit
Operation Unite
April 17–20, 2017
Atlanta, Ga.
https://vendome.swoogo.com/2017-rx-summit/8082

Call for Presentations
Submission Deadline Date: Friday, Aug. 5, 2016
https://vendome.swoogo.com/2017-rx-summit/2017-CFP
The Weekly Update is a service provided by the SAMHSA Preventing Prescription Abuse in the Workplace Technical Assistance Center (PAW) to keep the field abreast of recent news and journal articles to assist in forming policy, research, and programs to reduce prescription drug misuse or abuse. Please note, the materials listed are not reflective of SAMHSA's or PAW's viewpoint or opinion and are not assessed for validity, reliability or quality. The Weekly Update should not be considered an endorsement of the findings. Readers are cautioned not to act on the results of single studies, but rather to seek bodies of evidence. Copyright considerations prevent PAW from providing full text of journal articles listed in the Weekly Update.