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September 1, 2016

PAW Weekly Update

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SAMHSA
SAMHSA Prescription Drug Abuse Weekly Update
WEEKLY
UPDATE
Issue 189  |  September 1, 2016
The Prevention of Prescription Drug Abuse in the Workplace (PAW) TA Center addresses prescription drug abuse—a growing public health problem with increasing burdens on workers, workplaces, and our economy. To subscribe colleagues, family members, or friends to this listserv sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), please click here or send their e-mail addresses to paw@dsgonline.com.

WEBINAR

Employee-Targeted Webinar: A Workplace Wellness Approach for Prescription Misuse Prevention
SAMHSA
Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2016, 2–3:15 p.m. (ET)

This interactive webinar, facilitated by Joel Bennett, Ph.D., of Organizational Wellness & Learning Solutions, is geared toward workplace staff and best experienced in a group setting. Participants will learn about the role health consciousness plays in preventing prescription drug misuse; the risk factors associated with the increase in prescription drug misuse and healthy alternatives that can diminish those risks; action steps to implement healthy options; and how to reduce prescription drug misuse in their work setting. Those who plan on organizing a group to watch the webinar should contact Michael Neeper a MNeeper@OrganizationalWellness.com for materials to help with the session, including handouts and anonymous forms to assess changes in attitudes and behaviors resulting from the webinar. The webinar will also be archived on the SAMHSA YouTube site for later viewing.

Register
https://join.onstreammedia.com/register/22396317/paw
Index
Featured
Journal Articles and Reports
Professional Development
National
Marijuana
International
Northeast/Mid-Atlantic News
South News
Midwest News
West News
Other Resources
Webinars
Grant Award
Grant Announcements
National Take-Back Initiative
Take-Back Events & Drop Boxes
Upcoming Events, Conferences & Workshops

Featured

S.E. McCabe, D.D. Kloska, P. Veliz, J. Jager, and J.E. Schulenberg. 2016. “Developmental Course of Non-Medical Use of Prescription Drugs from Adolescence to Adulthood in the United States: National Longitudinal Data.” Addiction, doi:10.1111/add.13504.

In 1977–2006 Monitoring the Future data on students selected as high school seniors and interviewed at median ages of 18, 19/20, 21/22, 23/24, and 25/26, self-reported misuse of prescription opioids, sedatives, stimulants, and tranquilizers was highest in high school and declined steadily with age. Multivariate analysis showed socio-demographic and substance use behaviors at baseline predicted the future usage trajectory.

Read more:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/add.13504/abstract

T.J. Cicero, M.S. Ellis, and Z.A. Kasper. 2016. “Psychoactive Substance Use Prior to the Development of Iatrogenic Opioid Abuse: A Descriptive Analysis of Treatment-Seeking Opioid Abusers.” Addictive Behaviors, doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.08.024.

Surveys at intake of 9,540 randomly selected patients ages 18 and older who entered any of 125 drug treatment programs across the country for opioid use disorders from July 2010 to June 2015 found that only 47 percent were first exposed to opioids through a prescription from their physician to treat pain. A history of poly-substance misuse was almost universal among those who initiated with a prescription and progressed to use disorder treatment. On average, misusers who initiated with a prescribed opioid had prior experience with 4.55 other psychoactive substances. Almost all previously had used alcohol (93 percent), nicotine/tobacco (90 percent), and marijuana (87 percent), and 70 percent reported earlier or simultaneously prescribed psychoactive use: licit or illicit stimulants (55 percent), benzodiazepines (42 percent), or hallucinogens (39 percent). These findings underline that careful screening about psychoactive substance use is critical when deciding whether to prescribe an opioid and how to monitor patient use. [Editor’s note: it would be informative to compare the distribution of source of first prescription opioid among all adult medical and nonmedical users with this study’s 47 percent rate of initiation by prescription.]

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460316303045

Journal Articles and Reports

A.A. Al-Tayyib, S. Koester, and P. Riggs. 2016. “Prescription Opioids Prior to Injection Drug Use: Comparisons and Public Health Implications.” Addictive Behaviors, doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.08.016.

Between June and December 2015, persons who inject drugs were recruited using respondent-driven sampling as part of the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance system in Denver. Of 599 participants, 192 (32 percent) reported being addicted to prescription opioids before they injected for the first time. The addicted participants were younger than non-addicted participants; more recent injectors; more likely to report heroin as the first drug injected and the drug most frequently injected; more likely to frequently use benzodiazepines, non-injection prescription opioids, and non-injection heroin; more likely to inject daily; and were 1.55 times as likely to have survived at least one overdose in the past year.

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460316302969

K.H. Antman, H.A. Berman, T.R. Flotte, J. Flier, D.M. Dimitri, and M. Bharel. 2016. “Developing Core Competencies for the Prevention and Management of Prescription Drug Misuse: A Medical Education Collaboration in Massachusetts.” Academic Medicine, doi:10.1097/ACM.0000000000001347.

A review of the curricula at the four medical schools in Massachusetts revealed that although they taught components of addiction medicine, no uniform standard existed to ensure that all students were taught prevention and management strategies for prescription drug misuse. To fill this gap, the governor and the secretary of health and human services convened the deans of the four schools in 2015. They formed a medical education working group to develop a common educational strategy for teaching safe and effective opioid-prescribing practices. This group reviewed the relevant literature and current standards for treating substance use disorders and defined 10 core competencies for the prevention and management of prescription drug misuse. The medical schools have incorporated these competencies into their curricula and have committed to assessing students’ competence in these areas. The members of the medical education working group continue to work together on next steps, including connecting student competencies to competencies for residents, equipping inter-professional teams to address prescription drug misuse, and developing materials in pain management and opioid misuse for practicing physicians.

Read more:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27532868

G. Banerjee, E.J. Edelman, D.T. Barry, W.C. Becker, M. Cerdá, S. Crystal, J.R. Gaither, A.J. Gordon, K.S. Gordon, R.D. Kerns, S.S. Martins, D.A. Fiellin, and B.D.L. Marshall. 2016. “Non-Medical Use of Prescription Opioids is Associated with Heroin Initiation Among U.S. Veterans: A Prospective Cohort Study.” Addiction, doi:10.1111/add.13491.

In 2002, the Veterans Aging Cohort Study recruited a HIV-infected cohort and an age/race/site-matched control group of HIV-uninfected veterans at Veterans Health Administration infectious disease and primary care clinics in Atlanta, Baltimore, New York, Houston, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh, and Washington, D.C. Although not the primary focus of the study, its annual behavioral assessments through 2012 contained self-reported measures of prescription opioid misuse and heroin use. Multivariate analysis probed data from 3,396 (infected or uninfected) patients who at baseline (1) reported no life-time prescription opioid misuse or heroin use and (2) had no opioid use disorder diagnoses. Predictably, those who subsequently misused prescription opioids were 5.4 times as likely as other patients to try heroin.

Read more:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/add.13491/abstract

A. Barman-Adhikari, A. Al Tayyib, S. Begun, E. Bowen, and E. Rice. 2016. “Descriptive and Injunctive Network Norms Associated with Non-Medical Use of Prescription Drugs Among Homeless Youth.” Addictive Behaviors, 70–7, doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.08.015.

Of 1,046 homeless youth ages 13–24 surveyed at three drop-in centers in Los Angeles in 2011–13, 25 percent reported misusing prescription drugs in the past 30 days and 32 percent reported misuse among their social network. Misuse was more likely if street-based or home-based peers used nonmedically and less likely if a family member had warned against opioids. The authors suggest that prevention and interventions programs designed to influence non-medical use among homeless youth might benefit from taking a social network norms approach.

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/03064603/64

S.K. Dobscha, T.I. Lovejoy, B.J. Morasco, A.E. Kovas, D.M. Peters, K. Hart, J.L. Williams, and B.H. McFarland. 2016. “Predictors of Improvements in Pain Intensity in a National Cohort of Older Veterans with Chronic Pain.” Journal of Pain 17(7):824–35, doi:10.1016/j.jpain.2016.03.006.

Among the 12,924 veterans over age 65 receiving treatment from the Veterans Health Administration in 2010 who had persistently elevated pain scores and had not been prescribed opioids in the previous 12 months, improvement from baseline in pain intensity scores measured at least monthly in the year after baseline averaged 25 percent to 29 percent over time. In multivariate analysis, higher baseline pain intensity was associated with greater likelihood of reductions in pain intensity and the likelihood of reductions rose with patient age. Service-connected disability, mental health issues, certain pain-related diagnoses, and opioid prescription initiation during follow-up were associated with lower likelihood of sustained reductions.

Read more:
http://www.jpain.org/article/S1526-5900(16)30003-7/abstract

K.E. Dunn, F.S. Barrett, C. Yepez-Laubach, A.C. Meyer, B.J. Hruska, K. Petrush, S. Berman, S.C. Sigmon, M. Fingerhood, and G.E. Bigelow. 2016. “Opioid Overdose Experience, Risk Behaviors, and Knowledge in Drug Users from a Rural Versus an Urban Setting.” Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, doi:10.1016/j.jsat.2016.08.006.

A 2014 survey of 98 opioid users recruited at a methadone-maintenance clinic and a syringe exchange program in Burlington, Vermont, and 247 recruited from a methadone-maintenance clinic and a hospital-based drug and alcohol brief detoxification program in Baltimore found 36 percent had experienced an overdose. Overdose was more common among Vermont (46 percent) than Baltimore (32 percent) participants, although fewer Vermont participants reported past 30-day risk behaviors. The two groups did not differ in other ways. Both groups scored poorly on a 12-item test of opioid knowledge.

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0740547216301702

R.M. Gladden, P. Martinez, and P. Seth. 2016. “Fentanyl Law Enforcement Submissions and Increases in Synthetic Opioid–Involved Overdose Deaths — 27 States, 2013–2014.” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 65(33):837–43, August 26, 2016.

During 2013–14, the number of drug products obtained by law enforcement that tested positive for fentanyl (fentanyl submissions) increased by 426 percent, and synthetic opioid–involved overdose deaths (excluding methadone) increased by 79 percent in the United States. Changes in synthetic opioid–involved overdose deaths among 27 states were highly correlated with fentanyl submissions but not correlated with fentanyl prescribing. In 8 high-burden states, illicitly manufactured fentanyl appears to be driving the increase in deaths. An urgent, collaborative public health and law enforcement response is needed, including improving timeliness of opioid surveillance to facilitate faster identification and response to spikes in fentanyl overdoses; expanding testing for fentanyl and fentanyl analogues in high-burden states; expanding evidence-based harm reduction and naloxone access; implementing programs that increase linkage and access to medication-assisted treatment; increasing collaboration between public health and public safety; and planning rapid response in high-burden states and states beginning to experience increases in fentanyl submissions or deaths.

Read more:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6533a2.htm?s_cid=mm6533a2_w

C.M. Jones. 2016. “The Paradox of Decreasing Nonmedical Opioid Analgesic Use and Increasing Abuse or Dependence — An Assessment of Demographic and Substance Use Trends, United States, 2003–2014.” Addictive Behaviors, doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.08.027.

In 2003–14 data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, rates of past-year opioid analgesic nonmedical use decreased slightly from 4.8 percent of people ages 12 and older in 2003–05 to 4.3 percent in 2012–14, but misuse disorders in the past year rose from 6.0 percent to 7.5 percent. Clearly, many disorders resulted strictly from medical use. Nevertheless, multivariate analysis showed the odds of opioid use disorders were highest among those who also reported sedative, tranquilizer, or heroin use disorders.

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460316303069

J. Kalyanam, T. Katsuki, G. Lanckriet, and T.K. Mackey. 2016. “Exploring Trends of Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs and Polydrug Abuse in the Twittersphere Using Unsupervised Machine Learning.” Addictive Behaviors, doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.08.019.

Researchers collected 11 million tweets on Twitter that mentioned any of three commonly misused prescription opioids. An iterative unsupervised machine learning process of obtaining themes and then filtering out unwanted tweets narrowed the data to 2.3 million tweets that contained content relevant to misuse. The underlying themes and most representative tweets of each theme revealed high levels of social media discussion about polydrug misuse including evaluations of different polydrug combinations including other classes of prescription and illicit drugs.

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460316302994

J. Kang, D.R. Compton, R.J. Vaz, and D. Rampe. 2016. “Proarrhythmic Mechanisms of the Common Anti-Diarrheal Medication Loperamide: Revelations from the Opioid Abuse Epidemic.” Naunyn-Schmiedeberg’s Archives of Pharmacology, doi:10.1007/s00210-016-1286-7.

When opioid addicts run out of opioids, they sometimes mega-dose on the anti-diarrheal drug loperamide (e.g., in Immodium) to get a brief high that relieves withdrawal symptoms. Cardiac crises and deaths associated with mega-dosing led to suspicions that the drug is a potent inhibitor of cardiac ion channels that control heart rhythm. This study verified this serious, but previously undocumented side effect in a laboratory setting. Although over-the-counter loperamide drugs have been widely available and “safely” used as directed for many years, cardiac safety was not assessed. A retrospective case-control study of whether use-as-directed raised cardiac risk seems a necessity.

Read more:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00210-016-1286-7

D.M. Lydon-Staley, H.H. Cleveland, A.S. Huhn, M.J. Cleveland, J. Harris, D. Stankoski, E. Deneke, R.E. Meyer, and S.C. Bunce. 2016. “Daily Sleep Quality Affects Drug Craving, Partially Through Indirect Associations with Positive Affect, in Patients in Treatment for Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs “ Addictive Behaviors, doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.08.026.

For an average of 9.4 days, 68 people in treatment for prescription drug misuse disorders provided daily reports of sleep quality, affect, and drug craving. Greater cravings occurred on days with below-average sleep quality. In multivariate analysis, 31 percent of the association between sleep quality and craving was explained by positive affect, with poorer sleep quality associated with lower positive affect and, in turn, lower positive affect associated with greater craving.

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460316303070

S.E. McCabe, P. Veliz, C.J. Boyd, and J.E. Schulenberg. 2016. “Medical and Nonmedical Use of Prescription Sedatives and Anxiolytics: Adolescents’ Use and Substance Use Disorder Symptoms in Adulthood.” Addictive Behaviors, doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.08.021.

In 1977–96 Monitoring the Future data on students selected as high school seniors and followed through age 35, 20 percent reported lifetime medical or nonmedical use of prescription sedatives/anxiolytics at baseline. Among seniors who reported medical use, 45 percent also reported nonmedical use. In multivariate analysis, medical use without any history of nonmedical use at baseline was not associated with substance use disorders symptoms in adulthood relative to nonusers. In contrast, adolescents with a history of any nonmedical use had two to three times greater odds of substance use disorder symptoms in adulthood.

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S030646031630301X

R.K. McHugh, V. Votaw, O. Bogunovic, S.L. Karakula, M.L. Griffin, and R.D. Weiss. 2016. “Anxiety Sensitivity and Nonmedical Benzodiazepine Use Among Adults with Opioid Use Disorder.” Addictive Behaviors, doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.08.020.

Among 257 adults in inpatient treatment for opioid use disorder, past month benzodiazepine misuse was associated with significantly higher anxiety sensitivity in women, but not men, controlling for the effect of anxiety symptoms.

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460316303008

C. Moore, G. Lloyd, R. Oretti, I.T. Russell, and H. Snooks. 2016. “Paramedic Supplied “Take Home” Naloxone: A Randomised Feasibility Study.” Emergency Medicine Journal 33:e1, doi:10.1136/emermed-2016-206139.6.

In an urban area of South Wales, U.K., 102 randomly selected paramedics were invited to training on how to issue take-home naloxone kits and train recipients, with 85 taking the training. The 215 opioid overdoses that EMS responded to over a 12-month period involved 182 different people, with 25 people overdosing multiple times (an average of 2.32 each). Among the 182 different people attended for opioid related events, 148 were attended by paramedics after they were trained. Kits were offered to 35 of the 55 patients eligible for them and 25 accepted. Six deaths were recorded during the study period.

Read more:
http://emj.bmj.com/content/33/9/e1.2.short

B.A. Munro, L.L. Weyandt, M.E. Marraccini, and D.R. Oster. 2016. “The Relationship between Nonmedical Use of Prescription Stimulants, Executive Functioning and Academic Outcomes.” Addictive Behaviors, doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.08.023.

In 2015–16 electronic surveys of a convenience sample of 308 undergraduates from 6 public universities located in various regions of the United States, 18.8 percent reported misusing prescription stimulants. Students with clinically significant executive functioning deficits reported significantly higher rates of misuse than other students. Stimulant misuse did not affect the relationship between executive functioning and grade point average.

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460316303033

S. Nielsen, N. Menon, S. Larney, M. Farrell, and L. Degenhardt. 2016. “Community Pharmacist Knowledge, Attitudes and Confidence Regarding Naloxone for Overdose Reversal.” Addiction, doi:10.1111/add.13517.

A 2015 online survey invited a nationally representative sample of 1,317 community pharmacists in Australia to participate with 595 responding (45 percent). Eighty percent were willing to receive training about naloxone, 90 percent were willing to provide naloxone with a prescription, and 41 percent were willing to supply naloxone over-the-counter. Positive attitudes towards harm reduction were associated with greater willingness to supply naloxone with a prescription and over-the-counter (odds ratio = 1.1 in both cases). Few pharmacists were confident they could identify appropriate patients (34 percent) and educate them on overdose and naloxone use (32 percent). Mean naloxone knowledge scores were 1.8 out of 5. More than half the sample identified lack of time, training, knowledge and reimbursement as potential barriers for naloxone provision.

Read more:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/add.13517/abstract

L. Orriols, A. Luxcey, B. Contrand, B. Gadegbeku, B. Delorme, A. Tricotel, N. Moore, L.R. Salmi, and E. Lagarde. 2016. “Road Traffic Crash Risk Associated With Benzodiazepine And Z-Hypnotic Use After Implementation of A Colour-Graded Pictogram: A Responsibility Study.” British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, doi:10.1111/bcp.13075.

In January 2007, France adopted a newly standardized European Union pictogram system on medicine packages which indicated level of driving impairment risk. This case-control study linked national health insurance data and police crash reports for 69,353 responsible and 73,410 non-responsible drivers involved in injurious crashes between July 2005 and December 2011. Use of benzodiazepine anxiolytics was associated with an increased risk of being responsible for a road traffic crash during the pre-intervention period (odds ratio = 1.4). The association essentially disappeared in the 18 months post-intervention, but rebounded, returning roughly to its original level within 3 years. Non-benzodiazepine sedatives/tranquilizers also were labeled as high risk. The risk of being responsible for an injury crash increased steadily among users of these drugs throughout the study period. Thus, the pictograms had little or no effect on driver crash risk.

Read more:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27544927

K.A. Parks, M.R. Frone, M. Muraven, and C. Boyd. 2016. “Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs and Related Negative Sexual Events: Prevalence Estimates and Correlates in College Students.” Addictive Behaviors, doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.08.018.

A fall 2015 online survey of undergraduates at two upstate New York universities drew 1,755 responses (35 percent response rate). At least 29 percent had ever misused prescription drugs. Among the 254 females and 255 males who reported misuse, 76 percent had misused stimulants, 39 had misused anxiolytics/sedatives, and 41 percent had misused analgesics. During misuse episodes, 14 percent reported regretted sex, 7 percent of female students reported sexual victimization, and 6 percent of male students reported perpetrating sexual aggression. Multivariate regression indicated that anxiolytic/sedative use (odds ratio [OR] = 2.0) was positively associated with regretted sex. Anxiolytic/sedative use (OR = 1.8) and psychological symptoms (OR = 1.06) were positively associated with sexual victimization. Use of illicit drugs was positively associated with perpetrating sexual aggression (OR = 4.1).

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460316302982

A. Peacock, B. Lusk, and R. Bruno. 2016. “A Snapshot of Substance Use: Licit and Illicit Drug Use ‘Yesterday’ Among People Who Inject Drugs in Australia (2006–2015).” IDRS Drug Trends Bulletin, July 2016. Sydney: National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Australia.

In 2007–15, Australia’s Illicit Drug Reporting System annually conducted in-person interviews with 463 to 911 new participants ages 17 and older who self-reported injecting drugs at least monthly in the previous 6 months. Results revealed general in the proportions using cannabis, opioids, alcohol, and cocaine were stable over time, with most using cannabis and opioids. The split between opioid substitution treatment, pharmaceutical opioids, and heroin also was stable, as was the 40 percent rate of risky opioid use with alcohol or benzodiazepines.

Read more:
http://www.drugtrends.org.au/reports/idrs-bulletin-july-2016-a-snapshot-of-substance-use-licit-and-illicit-drug-use-yesterday-among-people-who-inject-drugs-in-australia-2006-2015

A.B. Peterson, R.M. Gladden, C. Delcher, E. Spies, A. Garcia-Williams, Y. Wang, J. Halpin, J. Zibbell, C.L. McCarty, J. DeFiore-Hyrmer, M. DiOrio, B.A. Goldberger. 2016. “Increases in Fentanyl-Related Overdose Deaths — Florida and Ohio, 2013–2015.” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 65(33):844–49, August 26, 2016.

Analyses of 2013–15 data from Florida and Ohio indicated that sharp increases in fentanyl deaths were associated with significant increases in the supply of illicitly manufactured fentanyl. Risk factors for fentanyl mortality included current diagnosed mental health disorder and release from an institutional facility (e.g., a jail, treatment facility, or hospital) within the preceding 30 days. The risk profiles of fentanyl overdose decedents were similar to those of persons dying from heroin overdose. The authors believe increased naloxone access, particularly among community members, is critical given fentanyl’s potency and the possibility of causing rapid death. The relationship between fentanyl deaths and increases in the illicitly manufactured supply suggests that law enforcement testing data on drug cases can serve as an early warning system.

Read more:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6533a3.htm?s_cid=mm6533a3_w

N.R. Schultz, M.M. Silvestri, and C.J. Correia. 2016. “Diversion of Prescription Stimulants Among College Students: An Initial Investigation of Injunctive Norms.” Addictive Disorders, doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.08.022.

Of 959 undergraduate psychology students ages 19 and older who completed an online survey at an Alabama university at an unstated date, 121 (13 percent) had a current prescription for a stimulant. Of these, 53 (44 percent) participants had diverted their prescription (i.e., sold or given away some of the pills) at least once in their lifetime. Diverters were more likely than users who did not divert their pills to say their close friends approved frequent stimulant misuse and agreed with various motives for misuse. All users perceived views of misuse and misuse motives among parents and among university students as a whole similarly, with educational purposes perceived as a more acceptable reason for misuse.

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460316303021

R.M. Steiger, S.A. Stoddard, and J. Pierce. 2016. “Adolescents’ Future Orientation and Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs.” Addictive Behaviors, doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.08.017.

A fall 2014 paper-and-pencil survey drew responses from 408 students at a Michigan high school (86 percent of the student body), but the authors analyzed only the responses from 250 students who answered all questions of interest. Among this possibly non-representative subset, 9.6 percent reported misusing prescription stimulants in their lifetime and 9.4 percent reported misusing prescription analgesics, including an unstated number of students counted in both categories. Higher positive future expectations and higher perceived risk of stimulants to future goals and were associated with a lower risk of stimulant misuse (odds ratio [OR] = 0.15 and 0.46, respectively). Higher perceived risk to future goals was associated with a lower likelihood of analgesic misuse (OR = 0.40).

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460316302970

V.R. Votaw, J. Wittenauer, H.S. Connery, R.D. Weiss, and R.K. McHugh. 2016. “Perceived Risk of Heroin Use Among Nonmedical Prescription Opioid Users.” Addictive Behaviors, doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.08.025.

In analysis of 2002–13 National Survey on Drug Use and Health data from respondents reporting past-year nonmedical prescription opioid use, predictably, reports of lifetime heroin use and regular heroin use were lower among those who said people who used heroin had a “great risk” of harming themselves (odds ratio = 0.4 for each). Known risk factors for heroin use were associated with lower perceived heroin risk. Among these opioid misusers, perceived risk of heroin decreased modestly from 2002 to 2013.

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460316303057

Professional Development & Opinion

G. Cochran, V. Hruschak, B. DeFosse, and K.C. Hohmeier. 2016. “Prescription Opioid Abuse: Pharmacists’ Perspective and Response.” Dovepress 5:65–73, doi:10.2147/IPRP.S99539.

Read more:
https://www.dovepress.com/prescription-opioid-abuse-pharmacistsrsquo-perspective-and-response-peer-reviewed-article-IPRP

B.R. Harris. 2016. “Talking About Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral To Treatment for Adolescents: An Upstream Intervention to Address the Heroin and Prescription Opioid Epidemic.” Preventive Medicine, doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.08.022.

Read more:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0091743516302274

L.A. Lin, A. Hosanagar, T.W. Park, and. A. Bohnert. 2016. “Opioid Overdose: Risk Assessment and Mitigation in Outpatient Treatment.” Journal of Addiction Medicine, doi:10.1097/ADM.0000000000000241.

Read more:
http://journals.lww.com/journaladdictionmedicine/Abstract/publishahead/
Opioid_Overdose___Risk_Assessment_and_Mitigation.99607.aspx


T.W. Park, L. Lin, A. Hosanagar, A. Kogowski, K. Paige, and A.S.B. Bohnert. 2016. “Understanding Risk Factors for Opioid Overdose in Clinical Populations to Inform Treatment and Policy.” Journal of Addiction Medicine, doi:10.1097/ADM.0000000000000245.

Read more:
http://journals.lww.com/journaladdictionmedicine/Abstract/publishahead/
Understanding_Risk_Factors_for_Opioid_Overdose_in.99609.aspx


A. Schwebach, and J. Ball. 2016. “Urine Drug Screening: Minimizing False-Positives and False-Negatives to Optimize Patient Care.” U.S. Pharmacists 41(8):26–30.

Read more:
http://stage.uspharmacist.com/article/urine-drug-screening-minimizing-false-positives-and-false-negatives-to-optimize-patient-care

National

Surgeon General Takes Unprecedented Step Amid Opioid Epidemic
CBS News
August 25, 2016

U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy has mailed letters to 2.3 million prescribers, urging them to do three things to address the opioid epidemic: sharpen their prescribing practices, connect people to treatment, and help change how the country thinks about addiction. (Includes video: 5:07 minutes)

Read more:
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/vivek-murthy-surgeon-general-opiods-health-crisis-letter-clinicians-zika

Why the Opioid Epidemic Impacts More Women than Men
Heather Boyd, Society for Women’s Health Research
August 25, 2016

Women are more likely than men to suffer from more than one chronic pain condition, such as chronic fatigue syndrome, endometriosis, fibromyalgia, and migraines. Women with chronic pain conditions are more likely to be treated with prescription pain relievers, at higher doses, and also use them for longer periods of time than men. This can led to more women becoming dependent on these prescription pain relievers and to more rapid onset than for men. Physicians and patients can work together to develop a treatment plan that manages patients’ pain appropriately and prevents addiction to pain medication from occurring. The Society for Women’s Health Research recommends all women with one or multiple chronic pain conditions talk to their physician about how to best treat their pain. It encourages women to be advocates for their own health and play an active role in their healthcare.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/society-for-womens-health-research/why-the-opioid-epidemic-i_b_11703268.html

FDA Approves Abuse-Deterrent Extended-Release Troxyca for Management of Severe Pain
Deborah Brauser, Medscape Medical News
August 22, 2016

The FDA has preliminarily approved an oral, abuse-deterrent, extended-release formulation of oxycodone hydrochloride and naltrexone hydrochloride (extended release Troxyca) for severe pain. The capsules, manufactured by Pfizer, consist of an extended release oxycodone “pellet” that surrounds a naltrexone core. If the medication is crushed, the naltrexone is intended to counteract the oxycodone’s effects. The FDA will make its final decision about the product in October.

Read more:
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/867718

Popular Drug Test for Drivers, Pilots Does Not Screen for Abused Prescriptions
Pei-Sze Cheng and Ann Givens, NBC
August 19, 2016

Some employers use a five-panel drug test to check for illegal drugs but not the most commonly abused prescription drugs. The Federal Aviation Administration and Department of Transportation only require drivers and pilots to take a five panel drug test, screening for tetrahydrocannabinol, illicit opiates, PCP, cocaine, and amphetamines. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued proposed changes last year to expand testing to include four additional prescription medications. Drug testing experts believe the proposal may take up to two years to go into effect. (Includes video: 4:00 minutes)

Read more:
http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/Five-Panel-Drug-Test-Doesnt-Screen-for-Abused-Prescription-Drugs-390749521.html

Pediatric Group Says Doctors Should Treat Teen Opioid Addicts with Medicine
Karina Shedrofsky, USA Today
August 22, 2016

The American Academy of Pediatrics has urged its members to consider prescribing buprenorphine or other medicines to treat opioid addiction. The other option is to refer patients to doctors who prescribe the drug. (Includes video: 1:49 minutes)

Read more:
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2016/08/22/pediatric-group-says-doctors-should-treat-teen-opioid-addicts-medicine/89042316

Marijuana

Senator Voices Concerns About Recreational Pot Ballot Question
Colton Lochhead, Las Vegas Review Journal
August 16, 2016

Though U.S. Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.) supports medical marijuana, he is opposed to nonmedical marijuana. On November 8, Nevadans will vote on Question 2, which could legalize nonmedical use of marijuana for adults ages 21 and older. Reid believes more studies are needed on the drug. Patrick Hickey, a Republican member of the Nevada Assembly, agrees with Reid. He worries about the effect of legalizing nonmedical marijuana, and how it affects workplace safety.

Read more:
http://www.reviewjournal.com/politics/election-2016/harry-reid-voices-concerns-about-recreational-pot-ballot-question

Southwest Florida Doctors Say ‘No’ to Medical Marijuana
Graham Hunter, NBC
August 25, 2016

Some southwest Florida doctors oppose the legalization of medical marijuana, or Amendment 2. Jonathan Daitch, M.D., worries medical marijuana will make it easier for children to get marijuana, and the state will see a repeat of pill mills. Dareld Morris, M.D., a proponent of Amendment 2, believes it would create more options for patients. Sixty percent of voters will have to vote “yes” for Amendment 2 to pass in November. (Includes video: 1:55 minutes)

Read more:
http://www.nbc-2.com/story/32836670/swfl-doctors-say-no-to-medical-marijuana#.V8CFn2mV9dg

Plain Township (Ohio) Employees Will Not Be Permitted to Use Medical Marijuana
Dave Nethers, Fox
August 25, 2016

Plain Township, Ohio, trustees added medical marijuana to their list of banned substances on the township’s drug free workplace policy. As of September 8, medical marijuana will be legal in Ohio. The law allows employers to establish and enforce a drug testing policy, drug-free workplace policy or zero-tolerance policy. It also states that a person who is discharged from employment because of that person’s use of medical marijuana shall be considered to have been discharged for just cause if the person’s use of medical marijuana was in violation of an employer’s drug-free workplace policy. Under the policy any employee, can and will be randomly tested and anyone who tests positive for medical marijuana will face consequences, even if they have a prescription. (Includes video: 2:03 minutes)

Read more:
http://fox8.com/2016/08/25/plain-township-employees-will-not-be-permitted-to-use-medical-marijuana

Medical Marijuana Outreach Group to Open Clinic in Southern Illinois
K. Janis ESCH, The Southern Illinoisan
August 20, 2016

A medical marijuana outreach group plans to open a clinic in southern Illinois in December that will help patients get registered for the state’s medical marijuana program. Before that, the group plans to conduct two educational seminars to explain the application process and to educate the public about the drug’s medical uses.

Read more:
http://thesouthern.com/news/local/medical-marijuana-outreach-group-to-open-clinic-in-southern-illinois/article_88b88a2a-8630-5c50-8089-5e025214a784.html

International

Canada Lags Behind in Adopting Safer Drug for Opioid Addiction Treatment
Karen Howlett, Globe and Mail
August 24, 2016

Canada lags behind internationally in adopting a safer alternative to opioid addiction treatment which could reduce overdose deaths. Suboxone is used in Canada as a second line treatment to those who cannot take methadone. United States and France use Suboxone as a drug of choice. British Columbia added Suboxone as its first-line treatment for opioid addiction and its College of Physicians and Surgeons introduced changes in July that make it easier for family doctors to prescribe Suboxone or generic versions. Family doctors in in Alberta, Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island are also allowed to prescribe Suboxone. However, Suboxone is more expensive than methadone. British Columbia’s drug plan spends $1,053 to $2,797 per patient per year on Suboxone, depending on the dose, but only $118 to $710 per patient on methadone. Despite the difference in dug cost, U.S. studies found significant cost savings with suboxone because the requirement for daily dispensing and witnessed ingestion at a clinic can be eliminated much earlier than for methadone.

Read more:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/canada-lags-behind-in-adopting-safer-drug-for-opioid-addiction-treatment/article31526916

Opioid Abuse’s Rising Financial Toll on Canada’s Healthcare System
Karen Howlett, Globe and Mail
August 24, 2016

Canadian spending on drugs to treat patients suffering from addiction to pain relievers increase 60 percent over a 4-year period. Excluding Quebec, public drug programs spent $93 million on these medications in 2014, up from $57.3 million in 2011. Spending is expected to rise as more doctors prescribe Suboxone. Public drug programs in the nine provinces spent another $200 million in 2014 on prescriptions for opioids. Forty percent of prescription drugs in Canada are financed by the public sector, with the remainder paid for by private insurance plans and individuals paying out of pocket. (Includes video: 4:11 minutes)

Read more:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/investigations/opioids/article31464607

Northeast/Mid-Atlantic News

Maine on Track for Record Year in Drug Overdoses
Shawn P. Sullivan, Fosters.com
August 24, 2016

Maine's attorney general fears the state will have a record high number of drug overdose deaths. During the first 6 months of 2016, the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner recorded 189 deaths attributable to drug overdoses, a 50 percent increase over the same 6-month period last year. Illicit fentanyl and its chemical analogs caused 44 percent of the related deaths between January and June. In 2015, Maine had a total of 272 overdose deaths, 126 in the first half of the year and 146 in the second half. To date, the attorney’s general office has distributed 866 doses of naloxone to 26 law enforcement agencies, 14 administrations at overdose scenes.

Read more:
http://www.fosters.com/news/20160824/ag-maine-on-track-for-record-year-in-drug-overdoses

All Vermont Pharmacies Can Now Sell Naloxone Without a Prescription
Vermont Business Magazine
August 25, 2016

Vermont’s health department has issued a standing order for naloxone. Now, pharmacies can dispense the drug to anyone without a prescription. Walgreens will begin offering naloxone without a prescription to customers beginning September 1. The order also allows insurers and Medicaid to cover the cost. Naloxone was used at least 241 times from Jan. 1 – June 30, 2016. During that time period, 44 deaths from opioids were confirmed by the health department.

Read more:
http://www.vermontbiz.com/news/august/governor-shumlin-announces-all-vermont-pharmacies-can-now-sell-naloxone-without

Massachusetts Launches Revamped Prescription Drug Monitoring Program
Shira Schoenberg, Mass Live
August 22, 2016

Massachusetts has taken two actions to address the opioid epidemic. The state’s nine physician assistant programs and 16 nursing schools will partner to develop a set of core principles around opioid prescribing practices and incorporate the principles into their curriculum. And, the state launched a redesigned prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP), which will be easier for doctors to use and will allow data sharing between states. Beginning October 15, doctors will be required to check the PDMP any time they prescribe a Schedule II or III drug.

Read more:
http://www.masslive.com/politics/index.ssf/2016/08/massachusetts_launches_new_pre.html

Prescription Drug Monitoring Goes Live Thursday
Eric Scicchitano, Daily Item
August 23, 2016

Pennsylvania’s revamped prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) went live on August 25. Pharmacies are required to input all Schedule II–V narcotics prescribed. Data has been collected since June 24. Medical professionals are required to check the database on each initial prescription for a patient and are encouraged to do the same for subsequent prescriptions. Doctors, dentists, and others not actively using the database should expect to receive unsolicited reports on patients flagged for potential addiction or diversion of pharmaceuticals. Cash transactions will now be registered through the PDMP.

Read more:
http://www.dailyitem.com/news/local_news/prescription-drug-monitoring-goes-live-thursday/article_46bc063e-776f-5628-afc7-c7e067a66cef.html

Massachusetts Must Focus on Trafficking Fentanyl
Matt Murphy, Lowell Sun
August 23, 2016

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health found fentanyl in 66 percent of the 488 confirmed unintentional opioid overdose deaths over the first 6 months of 2016, up from 57 percent over the same period in 2015. Governor Charlie Baker will talk to New England governors next month about what is being done to target trafficking of heroin and fentanyl across state lines.

Read more:
http://www.lowellsun.com/news/ci_30279719/baker-state-must-focus-trafficking-fentanyl

Virginia Army Sergeant in Prescription Drug Scheme Sentenced to 18 Months
Rachel Weiner, Washington Post
August 26, 2016

Sergeant Andre Granberry, who works for the Army Corps of Engineers, has been sentenced to 18 months in prison for helping his brother fill fake prescriptions for oxycodone pills and then resell the drugs on the black market. Granberry would sometimes wear his Army uniform while filling the prescriptions. He also helped recruit others. Over 8 years, the group sold about 130,000 pills for around $25 each. Granberry pleaded guilty and cooperated fully with investigators. He helped convict his sister-in-law by testifying at trial that she had been involved in the drug business. His wife was granted immunity from prosecution for her testimony in that trial. Granberry will be discharged dishonorably from the Army by next month because of his conviction. He was in the service for 10 years and was stationed at Fort Belvoir in Virginia.

Read more:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/public-safety/army-sergeant-caught-up-in-fake-prescription-drug-trade-sentenced-to-18-months/2016/08/26/3d1b46a2-6b93-11e6-8225-fbb8a6fc65bc_story.html

South News

Texas Finds Black Women Most at Risk of Pregnancy Deaths; Overdose a Leading Cause
Austin Bureau, Dallas Morning News
August 24, 2016

A state task force reported that black women in Texas are more than twice as likely as white women to die within a year of their pregnancies ending. Though black women delivered only 11.4 percent of babies from 2011 to 2012, they accounted for 28.8 percent of pregnancy-related deaths. The task force also found that 11.6 percent of recently pregnant women died due to drug overdose from 2011 to 2012. Among the 19 women with Medicaid insurance during pregnancy who later died of drug overdose, 14 (74 percent) died after the 60 day post-delivery mark, after Medicaid coverage typically expires. The task force recommends increasing access to health care for women in the year after they give birth, including screening for and referral to mental health and substance use disorder treatment options.

Read more:
http://www.dallasnews.com/news/politics/headlines/20160823-state-finds-black-women-most-at-risk-of-pregnancy-deaths-and-drug-overdose-is-a-leading-cause.ece

Wyoming County (W.Va.) Worst in Country for Prescription Drug Deaths
Wendy Holdren Register-Herald Reporter
August 21, 2016

Wyoming County, W.Va., is the worst in the nation for prescription drug overdose deaths, according DrugAbuse.com who examined 16 years of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data. In the website’s new report, “Overdose,” from 1999 to 2014, Wyoming County had a prescription drug overdose death rate of 54.6 per 100,000 people. Of the 30 counties identified with the highest rates, 10 counties were in West Virginia, with the southern West Virginia counties Wyoming, McDowell, Boone, and Mingo ranked 1–4. Raleigh County came in at 14th in the nation and Summers County at 16th. Other states with top ranking counties included Kentucky, Virginia, Utah, New Mexico, North Carolina, and Tennessee.

Read more:
http://www.register-herald.com/news/report-shows-wyoming-county-worst-in-country-for-prescription-drug/article_123649b7-d708-5896-8cd6-040aae835ebd.html

Morgan County (W.Va.) Students in Simulated Workplace Classes Will Be Drug-Tested
Kate Evans, Morgan Messenger
August 24, 2016

Morgan County, W.Va., high schools added simulated workplace classrooms to their career and technical education program. One aspect of the new simulated workplace environment is random drug testing for third and fourth year completers (junior and seniors). If students fail a random drug test, they will have a two week suspension from the class. They will receive three to four counseling sessions. If a student fails a second drug test, they will be dismissed from the simulated workplace program. If a student refuses to take the drug test, it is considered a drug test failure. Students can graduate from the simulated workplace career technical programs with a certificate that certifies they are drug-free.

Read more:
http://www.morganmessenger.com/news/2016-08-24/School_News/High_school_juniors_seniors_in_Simulated_Workplace.html

Midwest News

Illicit Fentanyl Continues To Fuel Increase in Drug Overdose Deaths in Ohio
Melanie Amato, Ohio Department of Health
August 25, 2016

In Ohio, unintentional drug overdose deaths soared in 2015. Fentanyl-related deaths increased from 84 in 2013 to 503 in 2014 and 1,155 in 2015. Overall, drug overdose deaths increased from 2,531 in 2014 to 3,050 in 2015. Ohio Emergency Medical Services personnel administered 19,782 doses of naloxone in 2015, which was 7,207 more doses than in 2013.

Read more:
http://highlandcountypress.com/Content/In-The-News/Headlines/Article/Illicit-fentanyl-continues-to-fuel-increase-in-drug-overdose-deaths-in-Ohio/2/73/34534

Narcotics on the Rise for Impaired Driving in Ohio
Kate Davison, WTOV
August 19, 2016

The Ohio State Highway Patrol’s St. Clairsville post reports driving arrests for narcotics impairment are rising. The dayshift and afternoon shift are making as many “operating a vehicle impaired” arrests as the midnight shift.

Read more:
http://wtov9.com/news/local/narcotics-on-the-rise-for-impaired-driving

Ohio Sheriff Indicted on 43 Charges, 38 Felonies
Craig Stoup, The News-Messenger
August 24, 2016

Sandusky County Sheriff Kyle Overmyer was indicted by an Ohio grand jury on 43 charges, including 38 felony counts that allege he deceived to obtain prescription drugs, tampered with records in the department’s furtherance of justice account, and stole prescription pills from drug take-back boxes at county police departments. Overmyer is still the sheriff in Sandusky County and is running for re-election in November.

Read more:
http://www.thenews-messenger.com/story/news/crime/2016/08/23/grand-jury-meeting-to-decide-overmyer-investigation/89194520

Survey Finds Lower Levels of E-Cigarette Use Among Indiana Youth
Indiana University Bloomington
August 19, 2016

The 26th Indiana Youth Survey showed that most Indiana youth are not misusing prescription drugs, with 93.5 percent of students indicating they did not use prescription drugs to get high. School-age youth are unlikely to use heroin, with a rate of less than 1 percent. Marijuana use was reported at 1.3 percent over the past 30 days among sixth-graders, 6.3 percent among eighth graders, 12.1 percent among tenth-graders, and 21.1 percent among seniors. National average usage is higher. Eighth grade students reported 0.9 percent use of Spice; 1.7 percent of 10th grade students and 1.5 percent of 12th grade students used it.

Read more:
http://news.indiana.edu/releases/iu/2016/08/youth-tobacco-survey.shtml

Naloxone Prices Skyrocket, Impact Minnesota Patients
Jay Olstad, KARE
August 23, 2016

Truven Health Analytics reports wholesale costs of naloxone from Kaleo went from $750 for two injectors last year to $3,750 this year; the from Amphastar went from $169.50 for 10 pre-filled syringes in 2013 to $330 in 2014; and from Hospira, which is owned by Pfizer, from $9.20 for 10 vials in 2005 to $158.30 in 2014. Rising prices are expected to force the Minnesota Department of Health to give less naloxone to first responders.

Read more:
http://www.kare11.com/news/naloxone-prices-skyrocket-impact-mn-patients/306428398

Drug Investigation of University of Minnesota Wrestlers Enters New Phase
Stephen Tellier, KSTP
August 21, 2016

Serious discipline is possible for some University of Minnesota wrestlers who were misusing prescription drugs. Wrestling Coach J. Robinson, who has been on paid administrative leave all summer, had a list of 16 wrestlers who admitted to using or selling Xanax last season. He refused to provide details to police unless his players were given immunity. State and federal prosecutors declined to bring criminal charges against Robinson or any wrestlers. Sources claim that university officials will begin interviewing all wrestlers suspected of using the prescription drug last season, and that any wrestler who is found to have been less than truthful could face suspension or a loss of their scholarship.

Read more:
http://kstp.com/news/university-of-minnesota-wrestlers-drug-investigation-new-phase-j-robinson/4240028

Pills Seized from Prince's Minnesota Home Contained Fentanyl
Stephen Montemayor, Star Tribune
August 21, 2016

Pills marked as hydrocodone that were seized from Paisley Park in Chanhassen, Minn., after Prince’s overdose death contained fentanyl, according to a source with knowledge of the investigation. Prince did not possess a prescription for fentanyl. Investigators still are not certain how the singer ingested the drug. However, they believe he took the pills not knowing they contained fentanyl. A week prior to his death, Prince overdosed on opioids but recovered after two shots of naloxone.

Read more:
http://www.startribune.com/pills-seized-from-paisley-park-contained-illicit-fentanyl-same-drug-that-killed-prince/390816101

West News

Colorado-Based Safe Rx Creates Secure Medicine Bottle to Curb Teen Drug Use
Marshall Zelinger, KMGH
August 22, 2016

Safe Rx, based in Colorado, is partnering with Wheat Ridge-based Rx Plus Pharmacies to test a childproof medicine bottle. The company uses a locking prescription vial which has a lid that looks similar to a bike lock combination. Patients line up the combination code and take the cap off. The four-digit code would be chosen by the patient, but the bottle would be supplied, programmed and distributed by the pharmacy. Safe Rx is hoping to issue these containers to patients needing Schedule II narcotics if they have children ages 12-25 at home.

Read more:
http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/local-news/colorado-based-safe-rx-creates-secure-medicine-bottle-to-curb-teen-drug-use

Other Resources

National Drug & Alcohol Facts Week Begins January 23
National Institutes of Health
August 25, 2016

National Drug & Alcohol Facts Week will be held Jan. 23–29, 2017. This annual, week-long observance brings together teens and scientific experts to shatter the myths about substance use and addiction. Several drug-specific toolkits are available for event holders who want to focus on the scientific facts about smoking, marijuana, prescription drugs, alcohol or new psychoactive substances (synthetics). New this year will be toolkits for college-aged and young adults, teens in the juvenile justice system, and a video toolkit.

Read more:
https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/national-drug-alcohol-facts-week-begins-january-23

Webinars

Pain Management in Dentistry: A Changing and Challenging Landscape
American Dental Association
September 2, 2016 | 3–4 pm (ET)
http://pcss-o.org/event/pain-management-in-dentistry-a-changing-and-challenging-landscape

Grant Award

West Virginia Health Department to Receive $300,000 for Surveillance of Opioid Overdoses
Wendy Holdren Register-Herald Reporter
August 26, 2016

The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources will receive $318,194 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control to enhance state surveillance of opioid-involved overdoses.

Read more:
http://www.register-herald.com/news/wvdhhr-to-receive-for-surveillance-of-opioid-overdoses/article_2c3e19db-c5c0-50fc-b475-cd077fdb5c70.html

Grant Announcements

Safety and Outcome Measures of Pain Medications Used in Children and Pregnant Women (R03) | (R01) | (R21)
National Institutes of Health
Due: Oct. 16, 2016 | Jan. 7, 2020 | Jan. 7, 2020
Read more (R03):
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-16-313.html
Read more (R01):
http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=284425
Read more (R21):
http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=284428

Safety and Outcome Measures of Pain Medications Used in Children and Pregnant Women (R03) | (R01) | (R21)
National Institutes of Health
Due: Oct. 16, 2016 | Jan. 7, 2020 | Jan. 7, 2020
Read more (R03):
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-16-313.html
Read more (R01):
http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=284425
Read more (R21):
http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=284428

Bottle Tracking Program
National Association of Drug Diversion Investigators
Due: None Specified
http://www.naddi.org/aws/NADDI/pt/sp/programs_grants
http://naddibottletracking.org/law-enforcement

National Take-Back Initiative

Drug Enforcement Administration
Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016
10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drug_disposal/takeback

Take-Back Events & Drop Boxes

Utah's Intermountain Healthcare Collects 6,400 Lbs. of Medication
Nichole Osinski, The Spectrum
Aug. 19, 2016
http://www.thespectrum.com/story/news/2016/08/19/intermountain-collects-6400-pounds-medication/88953742

Richmond County (Ga.) Event for Unwanted Medications Called a Success
Bianca Cain Johnson, Augusta Chronicle
August 22, 2016
http://chronicle.augusta.com/news/metro/2016-08-22/event-unwanted-medications-called-success

Drop Off Old Medications at New ‘Dispose-A-Med’ Station in Pima County (Ariz.)
Zack Briggs, KVOA
August 24, 2016
http://www.kvoa.com/story/32830824/pima-county-sheriffs-dept-installs-new-dispose-a-med-drop-off-box

Naperville (Ill.) Walgreens Safe Drug Disposal
Naperville Community Television
August 19, 2016
http://www.nctv17.com/naperville-walgreens-safe-drug-disposal

DuPage County (Ill.) to Add More Prescription Drop Boxes
Gary Gibula, Naperville Sun
August 22, 2016
http://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/naperville-sun/news/ct-nvs-more-prescription-dropoff-boxes-st-0826-20160824-story.html

Cameron (Mo.) Police Department Start Drug Take-Back Program
Eppie Pallangyo, St. Joseph News-Press
August 21, 2016
http://www.newspressnow.com/news/local_news/cameron-police-department-start-drug-take-back-program/article_00cf5dae-a298-527f-b798-1e444a5af146.html

Project Medicine Drop Now In West Milford (N.J.)
West Milford Messenger
August 22, 2016
http://www.westmilfordmessenger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20160822/NEWS01/160829997

Bloomfield (N.J.) Police Launch ‘Project Medicine Drop’ At Headquarters
Eric Kiefer, Bloomfield Patch
August 25, 2016
http://patch.com/new-jersey/bloomfield/bloomfield-police-launch-project-medicine-drop-headquarters

Oregon Lawmakers Unveil New Way to Dispose of Unwanted Drugs
Kristian Foden-Vencil, Oregon Public Broadcasting
August 22, 2016
http://www.opb.org/news/article/oregon-lawmakers-unveil-new-way-to-dispose-of-unwanted-drugs

Three New Sites in Berks County (Pa.) Where People Can Drop Off Unused Drugs
Reading Eagle
August 23, 2016
http://www.readingeagle.com/news/article/3-new-sites-in-berks-county-where-people-can-drop-off-unused-drugs

Upcoming Events, Conferences, & Workshops

Charting the Road to Recovery: Nebraska’s Response to Opioid Abuse
University of Nebraska Medical Center
Friday, Oct. 14, 2016, 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
The Dr. Stanley M. and Dorothy Truhlsen Campus Events Center
University of Nebraska Medical Center
619 S. 42 Street
Omaha, Neb.

This conference will discuss how to reduce the incidence of prescription opioid misuse and expand treatment for those addicted; and how law enforcement and healthcare can cooperatively design and execute programs to reduce and appropriately treat opioid addictions.

Read more:
https://www.unmc.edu/cce/opioid

National Symposium on Law Enforcement and Public Health Partnerships: “Saving Lives: Innovative Solutions to the Opioid Crisis”
U.S. Attorney’s Office, District of Minnesota, the U.S. Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, and the Hazelden Betty Ford Institute for Recovery Advocacy
Sept. 7–8, 2016
Minneapolis, Minn.
http://www.hazelden.org/web/public/event.view?eventId=5504149

Prescription Drug Abuse Forums
One Care
Sept. 10, 2016 | Lynchburg, Va.
Sept. 11, 2016 | Midlothian, Va.
Sept. 24, 2016 | Abingdon, Va.
Sept. 25, 2016 | Blacksburg, Va.
http://www.msv.org/MainMenuCategories/MemberCenter/PressRoom/News/2016-Archives/Upcoming-prescription-drug-abuse-forums--.aspx

2016 Annual Conference
International Health Facility Diversion Association
Sept. 13–14, 2016
Cincinnati, Ohio
https://ihfda.org/2016-annual-conference

Register:
https://www.regonline.com/Register/Checkin.aspx?EventID=1803476

Twenty-Ninth Annual National Prevention Network Conference
National Prevention Network
Sept. 13–15, 2016
Buffalo, N.Y.
http://www.npnconference.org

Register:
http://www.npnconference.org/registration

2016 Conference: Saving Lives: Access to Improved Health & Recovery
American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence
Oct. 29 – Nov. 2, 2016
Baltimore, Md.
http://www.aatod.org/national-conference/2016-aatod-conference-baltimore

Register:
http://www.aatod.org/national-conference/2016-aatod-conference-baltimore/register-now

2016 Fall Research Conference: The Role of Research in Making Government More Effective
Association for Public Policy Analysis & Management
Nov. 3–5, 2016
Washington, D.C.
http://www.appam.org/events/fall-research-conference/2016fall-research-conference-information

Bridging the Gaps: Reducing Prescription Drug and Opioid Abuse and Misuse Summit
National Association of Attorneys General and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials
Nov. 14–16, 2016
Arlington, Va.
http://www.naag.org/nagtri/nagtri-courses/national/bridging-the-gaps-reducing-prescription-drug-and-opioid-abuse-and-misuse-summit.php

National Rx Drug Abuse & Heroin Summit
Operation Unite
April 17–20, 2017
Atlanta, Ga.
https://vendome.swoogo.com/2017-rx-summit/8082

Call for Presentations
Submission Deadline Date: Friday, Aug. 5, 2016
https://vendome.swoogo.com/2017-rx-summit/2017-CFP
The Weekly Update is a service provided by the SAMHSA Preventing Prescription Abuse in the Workplace Technical Assistance Center (PAW) to keep the field abreast of recent news and journal articles to assist in forming policy, research, and programs to reduce prescription drug misuse or abuse. Please note, the materials listed are not reflective of SAMHSA's or PAW's viewpoint or opinion and are not assessed for validity, reliability or quality. The Weekly Update should not be considered an endorsement of the findings. Readers are cautioned not to act on the results of single studies, but rather to seek bodies of evidence. Copyright considerations prevent PAW from providing full text of journal articles listed in the Weekly Update.