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September 8, 2016

PAW Weekly Update

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SAMHSA
SAMHSA Prescription Drug Abuse Weekly Update
WEEKLY
UPDATE
Issue 190  |  September 8, 2016
The Prevention of Prescription Drug Abuse in the Workplace (PAW) TA Center addresses prescription drug abuse—a growing public health problem with increasing burdens on workers, workplaces, and our economy. To subscribe colleagues, family members, or friends to this listserv sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), please click here or send their e-mail addresses to paw@dsgonline.com.

IMPORTANT NOTICE

The Preventing Prescription Abuse in the Workplace Technical Assistance Center contract that produces Weekly Updates will end Sept. 14, 2016. If SAMHSA resumes Weekly Updates in the future, current subscribers will automatically resume receiving Weekly Updates. Any questions or comments should be directed to Deborah.Galvin@samhsa.hhs.gov. Thank you for your interest on this subject matter.
Index
Featured
Journal Articles and Reports
Professional Opinion
Professional Development
National
Marijuana
International
Northeast/Mid-Atlantic News
South News
Midwest News
West News
Other Resources
Grant Award
Grant Announcements
National Take-Back Initiative
Take-Back Events & Drop Boxes
Upcoming Conferences and Workshops

Featured

Mapping Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Enrollment and Use
Cynthia Reilly, Pew Charitable Trust
September 1, 2016

The Pew Charitable Trust in late 2015 surveyed administrators of all operational prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMP) about enrollment of in-state prescribers as of December 2014 and total queries to the PDMP by prescribers and prescriber delegates for 2014. This article maps and tabulates the responses. Kentucky, Maine, Mississippi, New York, and Tennessee reported enrollment exceeding 80 percent, with 12 states not reporting. Utilization exceeded 150 queries per enrolled prescriber in Arizona, Arkansas California, Kentucky, Louisiana, and New York, with 14 states not reporting.

Read more:
http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/analysis/2016/09/01/mapping-prescription-drug-monitoring-program-enrollment-and-use

FDA: Opioids Plus Sedatives Pose Fatal Overdose Risk
Dennis Thompson, HealthDay
August 31, 2016

The FDA has issued a warning that mixing prescription opioid pain relievers with sedatives, such as Valium and Xanax, can cause a fatal overdose. The FDA will require “boxed warnings” on 389 different products to inform health professionals and the public of this potentially lethal drug interaction. Products to contain the boxed warning will include benzodiazepines, prescription opioid pain relievers, and cough medicines that contain opioids.

Read more:
https://consumer.healthday.com/general-health-information-16/prescription-drug-news-551/fda-opioids-714449.html
http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm518697.htm

W.M. Compton, B. Han, C.M. Jones, C. Blanco, and A. Hughes. 2016. “Marijuana Use and Use Disorders in Adults in the USA, 2002–14: Analysis of Annual Cross-Sectional Surveys.” Lancet Psychiatry, doi:10.1016/S2215-0366(16)30208-5.

According to National Survey on Drug Use and Health data for respondents ages 18 and older, marijuana use increased from 10.4 percent in 2002 to 13.3 percent in 2014. Perceptions of a great risk of harm from smoking marijuana once or twice a week decreased from 50.4 percent to 33.3 percent. Changes in marijuana use and risk perception generally began in 2006–07. In multivariate analysis, reductions in perceived risk tracked rises in use. Self-reported marijuana use disorder symptoms remained stable over time at about 1.5 percent.

Read more:
http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanpsy/article/PIIS2215-0366(16)30208-5/fulltext

Journal Articles and Reports

D. Crowley and M.C. Van Hout. 2016. “Effectiveness of Pharmacotherapies in Increasing Treatment Retention and Reducing Opioid Overdose Death in Individuals Recently Released from Prison: A Systematic Review.” Heroin Addiction and Related Clinical Problems, Early online.

This systematic review searched for studies on recently discharged opioid-dependent prisoners receiving medication-assisted therapy drugs (methadone, buprenorphine, levo-alpha acetyl methadol [LAAM], or naltrexone) or naloxone. It found eight randomized control trials, one nonrandomized trial and five observational studies. Agonist opioid treatment (methadone, buprenorphine, LAAM) initiated before prison release was associated with significant post-release treatment retention on discharge into the community and post-release reduction in heroin use. Prisoners on buprenorphine or methadone at discharge had significantly reduced mortality risks in the first 4 weeks post-release. Published data were too sparse to judge the effects on nonfatal overdoses and resumption of other illicit drug use.

Read more:
http://www.drugsandalcohol.ie/25966

J. Ellison, A.Y. Walley, J.A. Feldman, E. Bernstein, P.M. Mitchell, E.A. Koppelman, and M-L. Drainoni. 2016. “Identifying Patients for Overdose Prevention with ICD-9 Classification in the Emergency Department, Massachusetts, 2013–2014.” Public Health Reports, doi:10.1177/0033354916661981

Discharge records for 96,419 patients seen at a Boston Medical Center emergency department in 2013–14 identified 4,468 patients (4.6 percent) who were treated for opioid overdose, opioid misuse, or polysubstance misuse. These diagnoses target high-risk patients who are candidates for naloxone rescue kit distribution programs.

Read more:
http://phr.sagepub.com/content/early/2016/08/18/0033354916661981.abstract

J.A. Ford and C. Pomykacz. 2016. “Non-Medical Use of Prescription Stimulants: A Comparison of College Students and Their Same-Age Peers Who Do Not Attend College.” Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 48(4).

Multivariate analysis of 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health data on respondents ages 18–25 showed that young adults who enrolled in college full time were more likely to report nonmedical use of prescription stimulants than their same-age peers who did not attend college. Use did not differ significantly between part-time college students and noncollege students.

Read more:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02791072.2016.1213471

L. Gao, P. Dimitropoulou, J.R. Robertson, S. McTaggart, M. Bennie, and S.M. Bird. 2016. “Risk-Factors for Methadone-Specific Deaths in Scotland’s Methadone-Prescription Clients Between 2009 And 2013.” Drug and Alcohol Dependence, doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.08.627.

This article examined mortality among Scotland’s 33,128 methadone clients with one or more prescriptions between July 2009 and June 2013. During 121,254 person-years at-risk, those in methadone-assisted treatment had 760 deaths related to drugs and 1,171 unrelated deaths, including 362 deaths that involved methadone. The methadone-specific death rate was higher for the 35 and older age-group (4.2 per 1,000) than for younger clients (1.9). For methadone-specific deaths, age-related hazard ratios (e.g., 2.9 at ages 45 and older) were steeper than for all drug-related deaths (1.9). Patient sex had no significant effects. The highest quintile for quantity of methadone prescribed at cohort entry (>1960 mg per day) was associated with an increased hazard ratio (1.8).

Read more:
http://www.drugandalcoholdependence.com/article/S0376-8716(16)30869-9/fulltext

S.L. Gold, K. Gilmore Powell, M.H. Eversman, N.A. Peterson, S. Borys, and D.K. Hallcom. 2016. “High-Risk Obtainment of Prescription Drugs by Older Adults in New Jersey: The Role of Prescription Opioids.” Journal of American Geriatrics Society, doi:10.1111/jgs.14430.

The 2012 New Jersey Older Adult Survey on Drug Use and Health obtained telephone interviews with 842 randomly sampled adults ages 60 and older. Among 725 reasonably complete responses, 14.1 percent had used a prescription opioid recreationally and 14.6 percent had obtained opioids in a questionable manner, such as from a friend or drug dealer, theft, fake prescriptions, the Internet, or doctor shopping. In multivariate analysis, those who previously used a prescription opioid recreationally had three times the risk of obtaining prescription opioids in a questionable manner. Other risk factors for questionable acquisition were attending or completing college, female sex, and a history of illicit drug use.

Read more:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jgs.14430/full

A.N. Hassan. 2016. “Lower Rates of Consistent Urine Drug Tests for Prescribed Psychotropic Medications among Patients On Opioid Replacement Therapy.” Drug and Alcohol Dependence, doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.08.632.

Among 1,470 patients on antidepressants or antipsychotics who were monitored with urine drug tests by the Millennium Health Laboratory, 457 patients (31 percent) were on opioid replacement therapy and 1,013 (69 percent) were not. In the opioid replacement therapy group, 55 percent of 1,388 urine drug tests contained expected psychotropic medications compared to 74 percent of 4,953 tests in the non-opioid group.

Read more:
http://www.drugandalcoholdependence.com/article/S0376-8716(16)30874-2/fulltext

E.J. Hawkins, C.A. Malte, H.J. Hagedorn, D. Berger, A. Frank, A. Lott, C.E. Achtmeyer, A.J. Mariano, and A.J. Saxon. 2016. “Survey of Primary Care and Mental Health Prescribers’ Perspectives on Reducing Opioid and Benzodiazepine Co-Prescribing Among Veterans.” Pain Medicine, doi:10.1093/pm/pnw140.

An anonymous early 2014 survey of 55 primary care and 31 mental health prescribers at the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health System found that 80 percent of both prescriber groups were concerned about concurrent use of opioids and benzodiazepine. Three in four strongly agreed with clinical practice guidelines that recommend caution in co-prescribing among patients with high-risk conditions. More than 40 percent of both prescriber groups indicated that co-prescribing continues because of beliefs that patients appear stable without adverse events and tapering/discontinuation is difficult. Over 70 percent endorsed more time with patients and better identification of high-risk patients as helpful in reducing co-prescribing.

Read more:
http://painmedicine.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/08/14/pm.pnw140.abstract

M. Kidorf, C. Latkin, and R.K. Brooner. 2016. “Presence of Drug-Free Family and Friends in the Personal Social Networks of People Receiving Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder.” Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, doi:10.1016/j.jsat.2016.08.013.

A survey of 355 patients at a community medication-assisted treatment program in Baltimore showed that 98 percent had at least one drug-free family member or friend in their personal network and that those network members often lived within 1.8 miles of the patient. Most patients (89 percent) were willing to invite at least one drug-free network member into treatment to support recovery efforts. Thus, mobilizing drug-free family and friends may provide a pathway to help individuals with substance use disorders access and benefit from community support.

Read more:
http://www.journalofsubstanceabusetreatment.com/article/S0740-5472(16)30282-3/abstract

M.J. Mason, G. Golladay, W. Jiranek, B. Cameron, J.J. Silverman, N.M. Zaharakis, and P. Plonski. 2016. “Depression Moderates the Relationship Between Pain and the Nonmedical Use of Opioid Medication Among Adult Outpatients.” Journal of Addiction Medicine, doi:10.1097/ADM.0000000000000253.

A convenience sample of 625 adult neurosurgery and orthopedic patients at a suburban satellite clinic of an urban academic medical center reported highly elevated levels of prescription opioid and benzodiazepine use compared with national data. Controlling for age, sex, and race, patients with high levels of depression and pain were more likely to engage in unprescribed use.

Read more:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27559846

R.L. Nahin, R. Boineau, P.S. Khalsa, B. J. Stussman, W.J. Weber. 2016. “Evidence-Based Evaluation of Complementary Health Approaches for Pain Management in the United States.” Mayo Clinic Proceedings 91(9):1292–1306, doi:10.1016/j.mayocp.2016.06.007.

Researchers reviewed 105 U.S.-based randomized controlled trials from the past 50 years that were relevant to pain management. Reporting of safety information was low overall, and none of the clinical trials reported significant side effects. The review focused on seven complementary health approaches used for one or more of five painful conditions—back pain, osteoarthritis, neck pain, fibromyalgia, and severe headaches and migraine—and found promise in the following for safety and effectiveness in treating pain: acupuncture and yoga for back pain, acupuncture and tai chi for osteoarthritis of the knee, massage therapy for neck pain with adequate doses and for short-term benefit, and relaxation techniques for severe headaches and migraine. Massage therapy, spinal manipulation, and osteopathic manipulation also may provide some help for back pain, and relaxation approaches and tai chi might help people with fibromyalgia.

Read more:
http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org/article/S0025-6196(16)30317-2/abstract
https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-review-finds-nondrug-approaches-effective-treatment-common-pain-conditions

R.B. Raffa, R. Taylor Jr., J.V. Pergolizzi Jr., S. Nalamachu, E.S. Edwards, and E.T. Edwards. 2016. “Application of Human Factors Engineering (HFE) to the Design of a Naloxone Auto-Injector for the Treatment of Opioid Emergencies.” Drug Delivery and Translational Research, doi:10.1007/s13346-016-0323-x.

This article reviews the human factors engineering process used in developing and testing the EVZIO naloxone auto-injector for use in nonmedical settings. The manufacturer claims the process optimized the auto-injector’s user interface, mitigated use-related hazards, increased reliability during an opioid emergency use scenario, and provided a user interface that reduced user confusion and misuse.

Read more:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13346-016-0323-x

H. Solhi, H. Sanaei-Zadeh, S. Solhi, M.A. Azizi Nadian, M. Gharibi, and B. Sadeghi Sedeh. 2016. “Meperidine (Pethidine) Versus Morphine in Acute Pain Management of Opioid-Dependent Patients.” Dovepress 8:57—59, doi:10.2147/OAEM.S112803.

In Iran, 122 opioid-dependent patients with acute pain randomly received intravenous morphine (up to 0.15 mg/kg) or meperidine (up to 1.5 mg/kg) for pain control by patient control analgesia pump. Patients who received morphine reported better pain control than those who received meperidine. Patients who received meperidine also suffered prominent withdrawal symptoms.

Read more:
https://www.dovepress.com/meperidine-pethidine-versus-morphine-in-acute-pain-management-of-opioi-peer-reviewed-article-OAEM

Workers Compensation Research Institute. “2016 Annual Report and Research Review.” Accessed Sept. 1, 2016.

This annual report describes Workers Compensation Research Institute’s reports that provided public officials and various system stakeholders with information to make better decisions. The institute published 41 major studies on a broad range of topics including the variation between states in use and prescribing of prescription pain relievers to injured workers.

Read more:
http://www.wcrinet.org/WCRI_2016_Annual_Report.pdf

P. Zheng, M.C. Kao, N. Karayannis, and M. Smuck. 2016. “Stagnant Physical Therapy Referral Rates Alongside Rising Opioid Prescription Rates in Patients with Low Back Pain in the United States 1997-2010.” Spine, doi:10.1097/BRS.0000000000001875.

The 1997–2010 National Ambulatory and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys estimated 170 million visits for lower back pain led to 17 million physical therapy referrals, with the referral rate stable over time. Lower referral rates to physical therapy were observed among patients insured by Medicaid (odds ratio [OR] = 0.5) and Medicare (OR = 0.5). Visits without physical therapy referrals were more likely to result in opioid prescriptions (OR = 1.7).

Read more:
http://journals.lww.com/spinejournal/Abstract/publishahead/
Stagnant_Physical_Therapy_Referral_Rates_Alongside.95863.aspx


R. Zoorob, L. Grigoryan, S. Nash, and B.W. Trautner. 2016. “Non-Prescription Antimicrobial Use in a Primary Care Population in the United States: Evidence for Action.” Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, doi:10.1128/AAC.00528-16.

Among 400 Latin American adult immigrants randomly recruited from patients at private and public primary care clinics that serve ethnically and socioeconomically diverse patients, only 20 (5 percent) reported non-prescription use of systemic antibiotics in the past 12 months. However, 25 percent said they would use leftover antibiotics and 14 percent had old antibiotics at home. Sources of antibiotics used without prescriptions or stored for future use were stores or pharmacies in the United States, leftover antibiotics from previous prescriptions, and antibiotics obtained abroad or from a relative or friend. Respiratory symptoms were common reasons for using non-prescription antibiotics. In multivariate analysis, public clinic patients, those with less education, and younger patients were more likely to endorse a willingness to use.

Read more:
http://aac.asm.org/content/early/2016/06/22/AAC.00528-16.abstract

Related Article
Why Some Are Stealing Medications from Their Pets
Jen Christensen, CNN
August 29, 2016

There is now scientific evidence that some people may be sharing their pets’ medications. In a study recently published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, people voluntarily answered that they used pet medications as a way to get off expensive prescription antibiotics. Some veterinarians have created awareness programs and workshops to help veterinarians address owner’s taking their pet’s medicine. The American Veterinary Medical Association suggests that veterinarians avoid giving unlimited refills of prescriptions or any other activity that might result in misuse of drugs. Experts warn that taking pet’s antibiotics or using antibiotics without a prescription can be a large threat to human health. Pet doses and secondary ingredients are not necessarily safe or appropriately time-released for humans.

Read more:
http://www.cnn.com/2016/08/29/health/people-taking-pet-medication

Professional Opinion

R. Goett, K.H. Todd, and L.S. Nelson. 2016. “Addressing the Challenge of Emergency Department Analgesia: Innovation in the Use of Opioid Alternatives.” Journal of Pain Palliative Care and Pharmacotherapy, doi:10.1080/15360288.2016.1209612.

The authors recognize that a truly opioid-free emergency department is not practical and that alternative analgesic approaches also carry risks. Innovations in managing pain in the emergency department are needed. But excessive restriction on opioid pharmacotherapy in emergency medicine carries the risk of replacing overprescribing with underprescribing of opioids. The commentary supports the need to establish a core of evidence to support efforts to increase the use of nonopioid and nonpharmacologic modalities for those suffering from pain.

Read more:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27541623

Professional Development

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2016. “Medication-Assisted Treatment of Adolescents with Opioid Use Disorders: Committee on Substance Use and Prevention.” Pediatrics, doi:10.1542/peds.2016-1893

Read more:
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2016/08/18/peds.2016-1893.abstract

R.P. Pack, A. Hagaman, S. Warfield, J.A. Gray, F. Tudiver, A. Alamian, and N.E. Hagemeier. 2016. “Interprofessional Research, Training and Outreach: The ETSU Prescription Drug Abuse/Misuse Working Group.” International Journal of Health Sciences Education 3(2).

Read more:
http://dc.etsu.edu/ijhse/vol3/iss2/5

National

Elephant Tranquilizer Leads to More Than 100 Overdoses in Three States
Christine Stapleton, Palm Beach Post
August 26, 2016

Carfentanil, a pain reliever and anesthetic used in elephant surgery, has led to more than 100 overdoses in three states in the past two weeks. The drug is lethal to humans. Just two milligrams can sedate a 2,000-pound elephant. In Huntington, W.Va., 27 overdoses were reported within a 1.5-mile radius during 5 hours on August 15. One man died. In Cincinnati, Ohio, 78 overdoses were reported in a two-day period. Jennings County, Ind., saw 14 overdoses and one fatal on a single day. Police made arrests in Indiana and West Virginia. Carfentanil is also suspected in 91 overdoses and eight deaths in Akron, Ohio, in mid-July.

Read more:
http://www.mypalmbeachpost.com/news/news/elephant-tranquilizer-leads-to-more-than-100-overd/nsMkX

Risky Alone, Deadly Together
Dan Keating, Washington Post
August 31, 2016

Death rates have risen prematurely among white women. One reason is because of the increase in overdoses from opioids and anti-anxiety drugs. Between 1999 and 2014, the number of middle-aged white women dying annually from opiate overdoses jumped 400 percent. Benzodiazepines contributed to a growing share of the 54,000 deaths over that period. White women are more likely than women of other races to be prescribed opiates, and far more likely to be prescribed both opiates and anti-anxiety drugs. Combining prescription drugs also plays a part in growing rates of premature death among white women. (Includes video: 6:09 minutes)

Read more:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/national/wp/2016/08/31/2016/08/31/opiods-and-anti-anxiety-medication-are-killing-white-american-women

Marijuana

A. Azofeifa, M.E. Mattson, G. Schauer, T. McAfee, A. Grant, and R. Lyerla. 2016. “National Estimates of Marijuana Use and Related Indicators — National Survey on Drug Use and Health, United States, 2002–2014.” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) Surveillance Summaries 65(No. SS-11):1–25, doi:10.15585/mmwr.ss6511a1.

According to 2002–14 National Survey on Drug Use and Health data, in 2014, 2.5 million people ages 12 and older used marijuana for the first time during the past year, adding 7,000 users daily. During 2002–14, the number of marijuana users increased among persons aged ≥18 years, but not among those ages 12–17. Among all respondents, the degree of perceived risk from smoking marijuana once a week and once a month decreased and perceptions of zero risk increased. The prevalence of past year marijuana dependence and abuse decreased under age 26. The percentage reporting that marijuana was fairly easy or very easy to obtain increased at all ages, as did the percentage reporting they got marijuana by buying or growing (versus getting it for free or sharing it). The percentage reporting that the maximum legal penalty for possession of an ounce or less of marijuana in their state is a fine and no penalty increased (versus probation, community service, possible prison sentence, and mandatory prison sentence).

Read more:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/ss/ss6511a1.htm?s_cid=ss6511a1_e

K.M. Keyes, M. Wall, M. Cerdá, and J. Schulenberg. 2016. “How Does State Marijuana Policy Affect U.S. Youth? Medical Marijuana Laws, Marijuana Use and Perceived Harmfulness: 1991–2014.” Addiction, doi:10.1111/add.13523.

Analysis of annual Monitoring the Future student surveys found that the perceived harmfulness of marijuana use decreased from 84 percent in 1991 to 54 percent in 2014. Across time, perceived harmfulness was lower in states that passed medical marijuana laws (odds ration [OR] = 0.86). In states with medical marijuana laws, perceived harmfulness of marijuana increased among students in grade eight after medical marijuana laws passage (OR = 1.2) and their marijuana use decreased (OR = 0.8). These measures did not shift among students in grades 10 and 12.

Read more:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/add.13523/full

L.R. Pacek, R. Vandrey, S.S. Dermody, R.L. Denlinger-Apte, A. Lemieux, J.W. Tidey, F.J. McClernon, A.S. Bangdiwala, D.J. Drobes, M. al’Absi, A.A. Strasser, J.S. Koopmeiners, D.K. Hatsukami, and E.C. Donny. 2016. “Evaluation of a Reduced Nicotine Product Standard: Moderating Effects of and Impact on Cannabis Use.” Drug and Alcohol Dependence, doi:10.1016/J.Drugalcdep.2016.08.620.

In a randomized trial, cannabis use did not moderate or mediate the effects of shifting adult daily smokers to cigarettes with very low nicotine.

Read more:
http://www.drugandalcoholdependence.com/article/S0376-8716(16)30862-6/fulltext

Maintaining Drug-Free Workplaces Where Marijuana is Legal
Jo McGuire, Occupational Health & Safety
August 31, 2016

This article gives examples of ways to maintain workplace boundaries, keep safety a priority, and help potential and current employees understand the need for sober working environments. If employers decide to change workplace drug and alcohol policy, they should consider all the risks involved. Employers should treat all employees equally and fairly; and take into consideration that contemporary marijuana products (whether leaf-based, edibles, oils, or extracts) contain greater amounts of impairing tetrahydrocannabinol than the traditional marijuana of the past, causing longer-lasting side effects and sub-acute impairment.

Read more:
https://ohsonline.com/articles/2016/08/31/maintaining-drug-free-workplaces-where-marijuana-is-legal.aspx

International

Bootleg Fentanyl Adds to Ontario’s (Canada) Opioid Crisis
Molly Hayes, Hamilton Spector
August 31, 2016

A coalition of health agencies in Canada reported that a record high year of overdose alerts and seizures of bootleg fentanyl, a counterfeit drug distinct from the prescription patch. The counterfeit drug has appeared in both powder and pill form, manufactured to resemble prescription opioids such as Percocet and OxyContin. It has also been detected in heroin and cocaine. In 2014, Ontario had 154 fentanyl deaths, up from 120 in 2013.

Read more:
http://www.thespec.com/news-story/6831293-bootleg-fentanyl-adds-to-ontario-s-opioid-crisis

Newfoundland (Canada) to Provide Naloxone Kits to Counter Opioid Overdoses
Canadian Press
August 31, 2016

The Newfoundland and Labrador governments in Canada will give 1,200 naloxone kits to regional health authorities and the Safe Works Access Program. The free kits will be available this fall.

Read more:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/newfoundland-to-provide-naloxone-kits-to-counter-opioid-overdoses/article31634390

Life-Saving Drug Distributed in Manitoba (Canada) Used Eight Times since January
Alana Cole, CBC News
September 1, 2016

Street Connections in Manitoba, Canada, has distributed more than 100 take-home-naloxone kits since January. Since then, eight people have been revived. In British Columbia, about 500 kits are distributed each month.

Read more:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/naloxone-manitoba-1.3743903

Northeast/Mid-Atlantic News

CVS to Pay Massachusetts $795,000 and Revise Prescription Drug
The Associated Press
September 1, 2016

CVS has agreed to pay Massachusetts $795,000, revise its prescription drug policies and retrain pharmacists. The drug company failed to provide its pharmacists with a way to access the state’s prescription drug monitoring program. CVS will now require its Massachusetts pharmacists to check the database before filling prescriptions for commonly misused opioids.

Read more:
http://www.heraldnews.com/news/20160901/cvs-to-pay-state-795k-and-revise-prescription-drug

Leaders Call for New York Governor to Sign Prescription Drug Abuse Legislation
WRGB
August 31st 2016

State and local leaders called on New York Governor Andrew Cuomo to sign prescription drug misuse legislation that would make it harder for people to alter or misuse pain medications. They also encouraged insurance companies to cover prescriptions for abuse-deterrent medications. (Includes video: 0:42 minutes)

Read more:
http://cbs6albany.com/news/local/leaders-call-for-governor-to-sign-prescription-drug-abuse-legislation

Video: Stockton University in New Jersey Will Offer Medicine Lockboxes to Students
Southern New Jersey
August 29, 2016

Stockton University’s Wellness Center and Office of Residential Life in New Jersey will offer 100 free medicine lockboxes to students this school year. (Includes video: 48 seconds)

Read more:
https://snjtoday.com/stockton-medicine-lockboxes-draft874964

Suffolk County (N.Y.) Officials Sue OxyContin Makers, Say They ‘Pushed’ Pain Pills
CBS New York
August 31, 2016

Suffolk County, N.Y., is suing 11 pharmaceutical companies for creating the opioid epidemic. Officials claim the companies encouraged doctors to prescribe opioid pain relievers without properly warning them of the risks of addiction. Purdue Pharma, Johnson & Johnson, Endo and subsidiaries of the companies were named in the lawsuit. It seeks unspecified damages for the treatment and rehabilitation of Suffolk County addicts. (Includes audio: 36 seconds)

Read more:
http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2016/08/31/suffolk-county-oxycontin-lawsuit

University of Delaware Research Tracking Opiate Use in the State
Katie Peikes, Delaware Public Media
August 30, 2016

University of Delaware researchers are using “geo-mapping” to gather neighborhood-level data to visually identify areas with high and low opiate use. The data could also help researchers identify differences in risk between demographic subgroups. The plan is to build a data set over the next four to five years that explains outcomes, drug treatment, drug overdose and crime. (Includes audio: 1:16 minutes)

Read more:
http://delawarepublic.org/post/ud-research-tracking-opiate-use-delaware

Nine Charged in Suboxone Cases at Sussex (Del.) Corrections
Gino Fanelli, Delmarva Daily Times
August 27, 2016

An investigation into mail entering Sussex Correctional Institute in Delaware led to nine arrests for distribution of Suboxone. The ringleader hired inmates to accept packages with drugs hidden inside. Of the nine people charged, six were already in jail.

Read more:
http://www.delmarvanow.com/story/news/local/delaware/2016/08/27/jail-opiates-suboxone-bust/89476110

South News

Anti-Addiction Drug Suboxone Abused in Southwest Virginia
John Ramsey, Richmond Times-Dispatch
August 28, 2016

Law enforcement officials have seen Suboxone replace oxycodone as the most popular street drug in Virginia. Some users snort or inject it to get high. Others use it to keep them from craving harder opiates. Suboxone is meant to be one part of medication-assisted treatment, or the drug paired with intensive behavioral counseling. However, counseling is not a requirement in Virginia. As a result, some cash clinics prescribe the drugs and ignore the counseling. The Virginia Secretary of Health wants the state to start requiring counseling alongside the medication. The state has added funding to increase access to medication-assisted treatment with Suboxone among other drugs.

Read more:
http://www.richmond.com/news/article_8a595b2c-994d-55ba-b459-aedde43a7e5a.html

Random Drug Tests for All Augusta (Ga.) Workers Seen as Not Needed
George Eskola, WJBF
August 30, 2016

Augusta, Ga., Commissioner Marion Williams wants to see all city workers randomly drug tested including elected officials and department heads. Currently, only employees in about 20 safety sensitive areas are randomly tested. Commissioner Wayne Guilfoyle argues that this proposal is not necessary since two thirds of employees are randomly drug tested, every employee has a pre-employment test, and everybody gets tested if involved in an accident. Augusta commissioners debated if the city is doing enough to fight drugs in the workplace, but it took no action on the matter. (Includes video: 0:47 minutes)

Read more:
http://wjbf.com/2016/08/30/random-drug-tests-for-all-augusta-workers-seen-as-not-needed

Fentanyl: A Call for Increased Awareness by Four Tennessee State Agency Leaders
WTVC
August 29, 2016

Tennessee Department of Health, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, and the Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security urged the public to increase their awareness about fentanyl. This article lists what the community should know about the drug.

Read more:
http://newschannel9.com/news/hooked-on-heroin/fentanyl-a-call-for-increased-awareness-by-4-tennessee-state-agency-leaders

Midwest News

St. Charles County (Mo.) Likely to Join Prescription Monitoring Program
Mark Schlinkmann, St. Louis Post-Dispatch
August 30, 2016

St. Charles County, Mo., will likely join the local prescription drug monitoring program that includes St. Louis County and St. Louis. County Executive Steve Ehlmann will ask the County Council next month to pass an ordinance requiring physicians and pharmacies to provide information to the county health department.

Read more:

http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/st-charles-county-likely-to-join-prescription-drug-monitoring-program/article_068441e8-9ef4-5494-afbf-c9fa38a8d7cc.html

A Thousand Ohio Pharmacies Offer Overdose Antidote without Rx
Associated Press
August 29, 2016

The Ohio Pharmacy Board reported that 1,000 pharmacies (47 percent) now offer naloxone without a prescription. At least one pharmacy offers the antidote in 79 of the state’s 88 counties.

Read more:
http://www.theeagle.com/news/nation/ohio-pharmacies-offer-overdose-antidote-without-rx/article_798391b0-552e-5bb7-9f68-fda28b80b6ff.html

Cincinnati (Ohio) Sees Estimated 78 Heroin Overdoses in 2 Days
Associated Press
August 26, 2016

Cincinnati, Ohio, saw 78 heroin overdoses in 2 days and the police asked the public to help identify the source of the drug. Emergency departments estimate they had 174 suspected opioid overdose cases this week, including 3 deaths. Authorities suspect Carfentanil, a drug used to sedate elephants, may be mixed in with heroin and causing the overdoses.

Read more:
http://counton2.com/2016/08/26/cincinnati-sees-estimated-78-heroin-overdoses-in-2-days

Arming Officers with Nalaxone Among Solutions to Heroin Crisis in Barberton (Ohio)
Stephanie Warsmith, Akron Beacon Journal
August 31, 2016

Barberton, Ohio, police officers use naloxone about once a week. They have been carrying the drug since March 2015. Since then, 42 officers have administered naloxone about 95 times.

Read more:
http://www.ohio.com/news/local/police-become-lifesavers-arming-officers-with-overdose-antidote-among-local-solutions-to-heroin-crisis-1.708455

West News

Nevada Governor’s Drug Summit Develops Blueprint to Combat Opioid Abuse
Pashtana Usufzy, Las Vegas Review-Journal
September 1, 2016

Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval’s Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Summit concluded with recommendations to reduce opioid abuse in Nevada. Recommendations included identifying physicians who overprescribe, increasing access to naloxone, and ensuring that patients who abuse drugs are connected to treatment services.

Read more:
http://www.reviewjournal.com/life/health/governor-s-drug-summit-develops-blueprint-combat-opioid-abuse

Related Article
Nevada Pharmacy Board Program Flags Prescription Abusers
Anh Gray, KUNR
September 1, 2016

Nevada pharmacists will identify medical providers with abnormal prescribing patterns using the state’s prescription drug monitoring program and then contact the licensing board of that prescriber. The program also notifies pharmacists and prescribers when customers are suspected “doctor shoppers.” (Includes audio: 0:53 minutes)

Read more:
http://kunr.org/post/pharmacy-board-program-flags-prescription-abusers#stream/0

Utah Health Leaders Launch Campaign to Increase Awareness about Opioid Misuse
Tamara Vaifanua, Fox 13
August 31, 2016

Utah health leaders launched a campaign to encourage doctors to talk with their patients about the risks of opioids and educate them about other types of treatment for pain management. (Includes video: 1:37 minutes)

Read more:
http://fox13now.com/2016/08/31/campaign-aimed-at-increasing-awareness-about-opioid-misuse

Southern California Postal Workers Arrested for Stealing Mail, Cellphones, Drugs
ABC 7
August 27, 2016

Authorities in southern California arrested nearly three dozen people, mostly postal workers, for mail theft and stealing packages containing items, such as prescription drugs, cellphones, and video games. The U.S. attorney for the Central District of California plans to step up enforcement activities and deal with corruption within the Postal Service.

Read more:
http://abc7.com/news/postal-workers-arrested-across-socal-for-stealing-mail-packages/1488094

California Doctors Allegedly Wrote Illegal Prescriptions for Cash, Supplied Gang Members
Jessica Rice, NBC Los Angeles
August 30, 2016

Two California doctors have been arrested and charged with selling prescription drugs without a medical purpose. Sonny Oparah, M.D., wrote almost 13,000 illegal prescriptions for drugs, such as hydrocodone, alprazolam, and carisoprodol; and Edward Ridgill, M.D., wrote over 21,000 prescriptions. An investigation into the East Coast Crips showed that the physicians served as large-scale sources of supply to gang members.

Read more:
http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/Doctors-Arrested-for-Selling-Prescriptions-for-Cash-Including-to-Gang-Members-391769051.html

Other Resources

School Stress: Five Myths about Stimulant Abuse
Sarah Royal, Partnership for Drug-Free Kids
August 31, 2016

This article lists five myths and facts about stimulant misuse. It also provides three ways to help college student handle stress and anxiety.

Read more:
http://www.drugfree.org/school-stress-5-myths-stimulant-abuse

Grant Award

White House Drug Policy Office Announces Grants for Nearly 700 Communities to Prevent Youth Substance Use
White House
September 2, 2016

The Director of National Drug Control Policy announced the award of $85.9 million in grants to 698 Drug-Free Communities Support Programs to prevent youth substance use including misuse of prescription drugs, marijuana, tobacco, and alcohol.

Read more:
https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/09/02/white-house-drug-policy-office-announces-grants-nearly-700-communities

$53 Million Awarded to Help Address Opioid Epidemic
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
August 31, 2016

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced $53 million in funding to 44 States, four tribes, and the District of Columbia to improve access to treatment for opioid use disorders, reduce opioid related deaths, and strengthen drug misuse prevention efforts. The funding will also support improved data collection and analysis around opioid misuse and overdose, and better tracking of fatal and nonfatal opioid-involved overdoses. This release lists the awards.

Read more:
http://www.hhs.gov/about/news/2016/08/31/hhs-awards-53-million-to-help-address-opioid-epidemic.html#

Community Programs: Cardinal Health Foundation Announces Generation Rx Medication Disposal Grants
Cardinal Health Foundation
August 31, 2016

The Cardinal Health Foundation awarded $360,000 grants to 17 nonprofit organizations nationwide to improve medication disposal programs.

Read more:
http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/fighting-prescription-drug-misuse-through-community-programs-cardinal-health-foundation-announces-generation-rx-medication-disposal-grants-300320030.html

BlueCross Launches Campaign to Combat Opioid Abuse
Business Wire
August 28, 2016

The BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee Health Foundation awarded $1.3 million to Coffee County Anti-Drug Coalition’s Count It! Lock It! Drop It! program to support training and outreach efforts in counties with high rates of opioid deaths.

Read more:
http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20160829005838/en/BlueCross-Launches-Campaign-Combat-Opioid-Abuse

Grant Announcements

Safety and Outcome Measures of Pain Medications Used in Children and Pregnant Women (R03) | (R01) | (R21)
National Institutes of Health
Due: Oct. 16, 2016 | Jan. 7, 2020 | Jan. 7, 2020
Read more (R03):
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-16-313.html
Read more (R01):
http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=284425
Read more (R21):
http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=284428

Safety and Outcome Measures of Pain Medications Used in Children and Pregnant Women (R03) | (R01) | (R21)
National Institutes of Health
Due: Oct. 16, 2016 | Jan. 7, 2020 | Jan. 7, 2020
Read more (R03):
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-16-313.html
Read more (R01):
http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=284425
Read more (R21):
http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=284428

Bottle Tracking Program
National Association of Drug Diversion Investigators
Due: None Specified
http://www.naddi.org/aws/NADDI/pt/sp/programs_grants
http://naddibottletracking.org/law-enforcement

National Take-Back Initiative

Drug Enforcement Administration
Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016
10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drug_disposal/takeback

Take-Back Events & Drop Boxes

Hardin County (Ky.) Prescription Drug Disposal September 10
Robin Hildesheim, Hardin County Chamber of Commerce
August 30, 2016
https://hardinchamber.com/household-hazardous-waste-and-prescription-drug-disposal-2016

Georgia State Now Offers Drug Drop Boxes
Sean Keenan, Georgia State Signal
August 26, 2016
http://georgiastatesignal.com/georgia-state-now-offers-drug-drop-boxes

Hawaii Pharmacy Offers Prescription Drug Disposal
The Garden Island
September 1, 2016
http://thegardenisland.com/news/local/pharmacy-offers-prescription-drug-disposal/article_db5786bf-bd68-5411-b8f9-a778c498a6a9.html

Charles County (Md.) Launches New Drug Take-Back Effort
The Island Packet
August 29, 2016
http://www.islandpacket.com/news/health-care/article98539802.html

Locations of Prescription Drug Drop Off Boxes in Ionia County (Mich.) Announced
WBCH
August 31, 2016
http://wbch.com/news/269217

Prescription Drug Dropbox Installed at Haddonfield (N.J.) Police Headquarters
Anthony Bellano, Haddonfield Patch
August 29, 2016
http://patch.com/new-jersey/haddon/prescription-drug-dropbox-installed-haddonfield-police-headquarters

Hazlet (N.J.) Announces Participation in Project Medicine Drop
Steven Viera, Greater Media Newspaper
August 30, 2016
http://www.gmnews.com/2016/08/30/hazlet-announces-participation-project-medicine-drop/#

Easier Disposal of Prescription Drugs Aim of New Summit County (Ohio) Effort
Stephanie Warsmith, Akron Beacon Journal
August 26, 2016
http://www.ohio.com/news/local/easier-disposal-of-prescription-drugs-aim-of-new-summit-county-effort-1.707442

Tullahoma’s (Tenn.) Prescription Drug Drop Box
The Tennessean
August 28, 2016
http://www.tennessean.com/videos/news/2016/08/28/89002590

Safe Drug Disposable Option at Vermont Police Station
Kristin Frechette, WVNY
September 1, 2016
http://www.mychamplainvalley.com/news/safe-drug-disposable-option-at-vt-police-station

River Falls (Wisc.) Police Station Disposal Box Good for Protecting Kids, the Environment
Gretta Stark, River Falls Journal
September 1, 2016
http://www.riverfallsjournal.com/news/region/4105712-disposal-box-police-station-lobby-good-protecting-kids-environment

Upcoming Events, Conferences, and Workshops

Seventh Annual Prescription Drug Abuse & Heroin Symposium
Indiana Office of the Attorney General
Oct. 13-14, 2016
Indiana Convention Center
100 South Capitol Avenue
Indianapolis, Ind.

Attendees will have the opportunity to network with 900 professionals and advocates impacted by prescription drug misuse and heroin use.

Read more:
http://www.in.gov/bitterpill/symposium.html

Charting the Road to Recovery: Nebraska’s Response to Opioid Abuse
University of Nebraska Medical Center
Friday, Oct. 14, 2016
Omaha, Neb.
https://www.unmc.edu/cce/opioid

National Symposium on Law Enforcement and Public Health Partnerships: “Saving Lives: Innovative Solutions to the Opioid Crisis”
U.S. Attorney’s Office, District of Minnesota, the U.S. Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, and the Hazelden Betty Ford Institute for Recovery Advocacy
Sept. 7–8, 2016
Minneapolis, Minn.
http://www.hazelden.org/web/public/event.view?eventId=5504149

Prescription Drug Abuse Forums
One Care
Sept. 10, 2016 | Lynchburg, Va.
Sept. 11, 2016 | Midlothian, Va.
Sept. 24, 2016 | Abingdon, Va.
Sept. 25, 2016 | Blacksburg, Va.
http://www.msv.org/MainMenuCategories/MemberCenter/PressRoom/News/2016-Archives/Upcoming-prescription-drug-abuse-forums--.aspx

2016 Annual Conference
International Health Facility Diversion Association
Sept. 13–14, 2016
Cincinnati, Ohio
https://ihfda.org/2016-annual-conference

Register:
https://www.regonline.com/Register/Checkin.aspx?EventID=1803476

Twenty-Ninth Annual National Prevention Network Conference
National Prevention Network
Sept. 13–15, 2016
Buffalo, N.Y.
http://www.npnconference.org

Register:
http://www.npnconference.org/registration

2016 Conference: Saving Lives: Access to Improved Health & Recovery
American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence
Oct. 29 – Nov. 2, 2016
Baltimore, Md.
http://www.aatod.org/national-conference/2016-aatod-conference-baltimore

Register:
http://www.aatod.org/national-conference/2016-aatod-conference-baltimore/register-now

2016 Fall Research Conference: The Role of Research in Making Government More Effective
Association for Public Policy Analysis & Management
Nov. 3–5, 2016
Washington, D.C.
http://www.appam.org/events/fall-research-conference/2016fall-research-conference-information

Bridging the Gaps: Reducing Prescription Drug and Opioid Abuse and Misuse Summit
National Association of Attorneys General and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials
Nov. 14–16, 2016
Arlington, Va.
http://www.naag.org/nagtri/nagtri-courses/national/bridging-the-gaps-reducing-prescription-drug-and-opioid-abuse-and-misuse-summit.php

National Rx Drug Abuse & Heroin Summit
Operation Unite
April 17–20, 2017
Atlanta, Ga.
https://vendome.swoogo.com/2017-rx-summit/8082

Call for Presentations
Submission Deadline Date: Friday, Aug. 5, 2016
https://vendome.swoogo.com/2017-rx-summit/2017-CFP
The Weekly Update is a service provided by the SAMHSA Preventing Prescription Abuse in the Workplace Technical Assistance Center (PAW) to keep the field abreast of recent news and journal articles to assist in forming policy, research, and programs to reduce prescription drug misuse or abuse. Please note, the materials listed are not reflective of SAMHSA's or PAW's viewpoint or opinion and are not assessed for validity, reliability or quality. The Weekly Update should not be considered an endorsement of the findings. Readers are cautioned not to act on the results of single studies, but rather to seek bodies of evidence. Copyright considerations prevent PAW from providing full text of journal articles listed in the Weekly Update.