West Virginia University Logo

Ethnic Disparities in Chronic Wound Healing

Tailored Patient Education for Adults with Chronic Wounds

Authors: Ranjita Misra1, Lynn Lambert2, Chandan K Sen3

1Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77845, 2National Healing Corporation (NHC), Boca Raton, Florida, 3The Ohio State University Comprehensive Wound Center, Columbus OH 43210
Rising healthcare costs have generated significant interest and growth in educating patients with chronic wounds.  Chronic wounds often result from serious health problems such as diabetes, heart disease and blood circulation disorders. Other contributing factors include poor nutritional intake and chronic tobacco abuse. Despite this, patient/caregiver education varies by acute care, outpatient setting, and homecare environment.  This retrospective study examined differences in patient’s knowledge and health behaviors by gender, diabetic status, and race/ethnicity. Data was abstracted from patient charts from a hospital-affiliated and research-based Comprehensive Wound Center (CWC) in the Midwest. The sample population was comprised of 1003 patients with 1873 wounds.

Racial Disparity in Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Authors: Ranjita Misra1, Lynn Lambert2, Chandan K Sen3

1Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77845, 2National Healing Corporation (NHC), Boca Raton, Florida, 3The Ohio State University Comprehensive Wound Center, Columbus OH 43210

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) healing is not homogenous by racial categories. Hence, this study examined DFU healing outcomes among Caucasian and African American patients treated at a hospital-affiliated Comprehensive Wound Center that provide advanced outpatient care for 16 weeks. Subjects comprised of 108 patients (54 % males, 46% females; 65% Caucasian, 21% African American and 15% Other racial category). However, analysis was limited to Caucasian and African American patients as the other category included many racial and ethnic subgroups. Areas larger than 200% of initial wound area were capped at 200% to reduce the wound area variability. Risk factor modeling approach was used to determine covariates to be added to the model; covariates that acted either as a confounder or as an effect modifier were included.

Chronic Wound Patient's Learning Preference and Motivational Level

Authors: Ranjita Misra1, Ping Xiang1, Ron McBride1, Lynn Lambert2, Chandan K Sen3

1Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77845, 2National Healing Corporation (NHC), Boca Raton, Florida, 3The Ohio State University Comprehensive Wound Center, Columbus OH 43210

Effective patient education, supported by the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, requires assessment of patients’ learning preferences and motivational levels which are part of the learning assessments completed at clinics and hospitals. Motivation and learning preferences, though, are two largely unexplored factors that contribute to the management of chronic wounds. Gender and older age has also been shown to be determinants of motivation and learning preferences.  This study examined learning preferences and motivation in adult patients by age and gender.  The sample comprised of 1003 patients (29 % elderly, 53% females) treated for acute, acute traumatic or chronic wounds at a hospital-affiliated Comprehensive Wound Center in the Midwest.

Posters